Third from the left is local participant of Swim BC’s provincial para camp Logan Godsoe.

Third from the left is local participant of Swim BC’s provincial para camp Logan Godsoe.

Logan Godsoe rides the waves to Richmond

Taking on a challenge is nothing new for 12-year-old Logan Godsoe.

Taking on a challenge is nothing new for 12-year-old Logan Godsoe.

This talented young athlete has been swimming competitively with the Waverides for a year.

Logan was selected to participate in a provincial para camp for Swim B.C. in Richmond June 13 – 15 after being selected  from all the para swimmers in the province.

Logan was born with an underdeveloped right arm.

Because of this he has certain exemptions when participating in swim meets.

This allows him to finish the breaststroke and butterfly stroke with only one hand touching the wall, rather than both hands touching the wall at the same time.

Logan was also swimming with a cracked collar bone.

Despite this, the water is where he feels at home.

This camp provided learning opportunities for all the participants.

They would use a Go-Pro to record the swimmers underwater, pointing out any errors in form and providing helpful ways to improve.

The camp activities were structured so 31 days of training were confined to just three days.

Aside from training in the water, the coaches at the camp also instructed the swimmers in land training, using different stretches and strength training, such as planks, to help exercise and develope the muscles used for swimming.

Though it was not only the training aspect that made this a great experience for the young swimmer, but also the social interaction with all the other camp members as well as coaches.

“I loved meeting all the other para swimmers. They were all so nice even though I was the youngest one there,” Logan said.

“And all the coaches were nice and treated everyone like they are all part of the same swim club.”

It was three days of new experiences for Logan, such as jumping off the high dive. Swimming with a crack collar bone made this experience painful for Logan as he dove into the water.

“My arm rocketed up and shocked in pain,” Logan said. “But the next day I was able to stretch it and it was a lot better.”

For Logan this was an amazing experience and he has every intention of returning next year if given the opportunity.

He found the camp tiring but well worth the effort.

This opportunity was not only a worth-while experience for Logan but also for coach Jeritt Brink who accompanied the Waverider to Richmond.

“This was my first para camp and experience at the B.C. level,” Brink said.

“It was an experience I won’t forget. You see how the young kids push through adversity, connect with one another and how they lift one another spirits. Its truly inspirational.”

Though Logan had always felt at home in the water, it was a chance encounter with Waverider coach Jeritt Brink while swimming in a lap lane that ultimately encouraged this swimmer to join.

Logan took the opportunity to immerse himself in a sport he truly enjoyed and improve his form.

Though the Waveriders season is nearly over, Logan has no doubt he will be in the waters with his fellow Waveriders next year, taking on competitions and always learning ways to improve.

 

Quesnel Cariboo Observer

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