Excelling at new distance

Not only did Salmon Arm’s Emmy Sim complete her first marathon as the youngest competitor in the race, she aced her category.

Fast: Emmy Sim takes part in a cross-country run at Larch Hills in 2011 prior to taking on the marathon length.

Fast: Emmy Sim takes part in a cross-country run at Larch Hills in 2011 prior to taking on the marathon length.

Not only did Salmon Arm’s Emmy Sim complete her first marathon as the youngest competitor in the race, she aced her category.

Emmy and her dad Richard took part in the 42.2-kilometre 2012 BMO Vancouver Marathon on May 6, and her sister Meryn participated in the 21-km. half-marathon.

A runner cannot take part in the marathon until they’re 16. Emmy squeezed under the wire; her 16th birthday was on May 4, just two days before the big race.

Age was clearly not a disadvantage for her.

In the female 19-and-under category, Emmy was fastest of the 10 runners participating, finishing in a time of 3:50:38. Out of the total field of 1,838 women competing in all categories, she placed 260th.

Emmy’s dad Richard also did well, placing 44th out of 106 in the men’s 60 to 64 category, finishing in a time of 4:25:41. Similarly Meryn, competing in the half-marathon, placed 18th out of 67 in her 19-and-under category in a time of 1:57:21.

Emmy said the marathon was a good experience, one she learned from.

“I started out way too fast,” she says, explaining that’s a common pattern for her when she does shorter races. In this case, she began by trying to pace herself with someone who, she realized later, was too fast. Consequently, she completed the first half of the race in 1:30:25 and the second half in 2:19:51.

About three-quarters along, the race started to get tough for her, but the last five kilometres “was really cool,” she says.

“There started to be crowds of people around the race course, cheering. It was so exhilarating.”

When Emmy got to the finish, she figures she must have looked pretty bad.

She sat down and people gave her food.

“I didn’t want to move – I sat and ate food for so long,” she says, explaining that her family finally found her.

Soon after she went to sleep.

“I pretty much slept for four hours straight,” she says, and then ate more food.

She notes, laughing, that her youngest sister, who didn’t participate, was pretty bored after the race. There they were, in Vancouver, with all its possibilities, and her whole family was sleeping.

Emmy says she was sore for a couple of days after the event – “it was a little difficult walking downstairs for a while there” – but not as bad as she thought it would be.

Will she do another marathon?

Absolutely.

“It was a really good experience.”

Other locals

The Sims were not alone in representing Salmon Arm. In fact, 26 other Salmon Arm names are listed in results for the marathon and half-marathon.

Participating in the marathon were: Luke Maygard, Barry Wilson, Sherry Lucas, Chris Welder, Gerald Christie, Chris Arnason and Kealy Mills.

In the half-marathon, Salmon Arm’s Duncan Morris took second spot out of 71 competitors in his 65- to 69-year-old male category. Also placing in the top 10 was Mary Hamilton, who came ninth out of 50 in the female 65 to 69 category.

Other participants in the half-marathon were Peter Robertson, Jared MacLeod, Nick Matheson, Erin Jackson, Bailey Wong, Bruce Kendall, Ray Warner, Elaine Warner, Robert Huot, Bob Bagg, Lila Bagg, Monja Jespersen, Franwyn Burman, Debbie Christie, Marietjie Du Plessis, Lisa-Marie Kopp and Karen Wilson.

Salmon Arm Observer