What next

THE THRILL of a political victory will meet reality after this weekend when local election winners contemplate what’s ahead.

THE THRILL of a political victory will meet reality after this weekend when local election winners contemplate what’s ahead.

Someone just recently wondered who would want to become a school district trustee when, for the past 10 years, the district has been forced to cut, cut, cut.

So true. Next up for a newly-constituted Coast Mountains school district board is the closure of Thornhill Junior Secondary and a wholesale shifting of grades.

From practically invisible one minute to the elephant in the room the next, the slumbering plan for a super-dump at Forceman Ridge will occupy more of the Kitimat-Stikine regional district’s board’s time then practically anything else it will face.

The plan’s only realistic chance of making economic sense is to have a parallel waste diversion effort in place. But that’s going to be costly and an uphill philosophical struggle.

Those at the Nov. 8 municipal all candidates forum heard practically every candidate offer to lie down in front of heavy machinery if that’s what it would take to stop Enbridge from building its Northern Gateway pipeline.

Fine and dandy. But some citizens will want council to spend at least as much time finding ways to employ other machinery to improve local roads, sidewalks and bike paths. After a slow start, the 2008-2011 council did not a bad job of this and people will expect that to continue.

 

Terrace Standard