Walls made of words come down

A wall divided the space for worship so that congregations with differing doctrines could use the same building

Glasgow Cathedral formerly had wall inside to separate different denominations.

Glasgow Cathedral formerly had wall inside to separate different denominations.

Eleanor Deckert

My husband Kevin travelled to Scotland in 2007. One detail he learned about the Glasgow Cathedral, in continuous use since 1197, made an impression. From the time of the Reformation in the mid-1500s until the mid-1800s, a wall divided the space for worship so that congregations with differing doctrines could use the same building.

The wall of rocks has been removed. The wall of words is still an obstacle. Is it permanent?

Here, now, there are some who want to take that wall of words down. It seems to me that this world-wide trend is most possible in places like Clearwater where we know we need, respect and interact with our neighbours.

On Sunday, Sept. 13, an outdoor interdenominational worship service and barbeque held at Dutch Lake Community Centre was one step towards breaching this wall. Pastors, musicians and participants from at least six denominations attended. Over 100 people enjoyed the picnic afterwards. More events are being planned.

On Thursday, Sept. 24, at the St. James church in Clearwater, a formal recognition of more walls coming down will occur when the United Church becomes “Trinity Shared Ministry” bringing Anglican, Lutheran and United together served by one pastor, Rev. Brian Krushel.

 

Local churches are also pooling their resources to provide a vibrant Youth Program and refurbish the bus to take youth on outings.

 

 

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