A TransLink bus stops at the Carvolth bus exchange in North Langley. Transit service in Langley has expanded, although it remains a fraction of what is available in cities closer to the urban core of Metro Vancouver. A Vancouver Island resident suggests a sales tax increase to fund transit expansion may make the most sense.

A TransLink bus stops at the Carvolth bus exchange in North Langley. Transit service in Langley has expanded, although it remains a fraction of what is available in cities closer to the urban core of Metro Vancouver. A Vancouver Island resident suggests a sales tax increase to fund transit expansion may make the most sense.

Sales tax boost may be best bet

One way or another, taxpayers are going to foot the bill for transit funding. The BC Liberal government will never increase income taxes.

Editor:  There are many pros and cons to this vote on the additional tax to pay for transit funding.  Taxpayers must note that presently they hold the ball on this tax.

If the tax passes, they have to remember, everyone pays, including the tourists that come to visit the Lower Mainland. Also, the tax being incorporated into the seven per cent retail tax is remitted to the provincial government in Victoria.

Lower Mainland municipalities have no access to this tax, so the money is safe and cannot be spent foolishly like on extravagant wages. If the tax does not pass, there are many Plan B’s available.

One of  the Plan B’s could be a substantial increase in property taxes. One way or another, the taxpayers are going to foot the bill for transit funding, because the BC Liberal government is not going to ever increase income taxes.

Looking at the vote option  in comparison to many Plan B’s, the most logical and cheapest form option to the taxpayers would be to vote for the additional 0.5 per cent.

Joe Sawchuk,

Duncan

Langley Times

Just Posted

Most Read