Prime Minister Justin Trudeau takes a few moments to talk to some local children before leaving the Nemiah Valley Friday afternoon where the leader made history by visiting the Tsilhqot'in Nation's traditional title lands and personally exonerating six war chiefs who were hanged 154 years ago for killing 18 members of a road building crew. See page 3 for story. Angie Mindus photo

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau takes a few moments to talk to some local children before leaving the Nemiah Valley Friday afternoon where the leader made history by visiting the Tsilhqot'in Nation's traditional title lands and personally exonerating six war chiefs who were hanged 154 years ago for killing 18 members of a road building crew. See page 3 for story. Angie Mindus photo

Letter: Trudeau’s political foreign policy

As most people know, Justin Trudeau used to teach drama.

As most people know, Justin Trudeau used to teach drama.

As Prime Minister he has a new job, acting in the best interests of all Canadians, however, he appears to be preoccupied with the razzle-dazzle of the spotlights shining on the world stage. That’s where he relishes strutting his stuff.

One of the guiding principles of effective leadership is to praise in public and admonish in private. Apparently, our prime minister’s instinct is to admonish in public and to congratulate himself, also in public. Pointing a wagging finger at the repressive leaders in Saudi Arabia, China, Russia, Venezuela and other such counties, and then self-righteously lecturing them on the inherent goodness of ‘Trudeauism,’ may garner favourable short-term headlines, but at what long-term cost to Canada?

I believe the Canadian government could achieve more by quietly arm-twisting foreign representatives behind closed doors.

Trudeau should, if he is actually capable, rethink his government’s foreign affairs policy, which seems to be based on talk condescendingly and carry a ‘selfie’ stick.

Lloyd Atkins

Vernon Morning Star

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