Letter: proposed 216th interchange a health hazard

Editor:  have always been proud to call myself a Canadian.

However, I have discovered that over 100 countries in the world have legislature in place so their citizens have a right to a healthy environment. Canada does not.

This information came to light when a large group of us in Walnut Grove opposed the planned 216th Street interchange going north.

We will have no buffer zone to protect us from noise and air pollution, while 22,000 vehicles per day will go directly past homes and two elementary schools.

The health facts are overwhelming — this will lead to cardiovascular disease, lung disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s, asthma, autism, childhood asthma and leukemia. I almost forgot — premature death.  The children are most at risk due to their smaller size and undeveloped lungs.

Our mayor and council have been presented with all the health facts. Their response was, “It’s a done deal.”

In other words, development trumps health.

We have brought in health experts in the fields of noise and air quality.

They say we need a health impact study. Our council says, No, it’s a done deal.

These same experts, doctors from UBC, recommend an independent study of other designs and locations with health in mind.

Council says no.

In fact, 192 Street is an excellent alternative to 216 Street. Trucks will not pass homes and schools, spewing heavy pollution.

It lines up with the Port Kells industrial area, the South Fraser Perimeter Road and the Golden Ears Bridge crossing.

The council is not interested.

We appeal to the provincial government and they ignore us.

The David Suzuki Foundation supports us.

They are not surprised that our government is moving forward in light of the health risks they will create. This is why we need an act to protect out health.

I am not against development. I am against development that does not put health fist and foremost.

Is one child with autism or leukemia not one too many?

Linda Nash, Walnut Grove

Langley Times

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