Melissa Oakes’ children, Ruby, 5, and Finley, 8, joined Earth Rangers along with  100,000 other children across Canada. Their art project involved learning about the beaver, including speaking with a First Nations elder about the hardworking rodent that has lately found itself at the centre of controversy.

Melissa Oakes’ children, Ruby, 5, and Finley, 8, joined Earth Rangers along with 100,000 other children across Canada. Their art project involved learning about the beaver, including speaking with a First Nations elder about the hardworking rodent that has lately found itself at the centre of controversy.

Letter: Many humane options exist for managing beavers

Editor: I read the recent article in the paper (the Times, Jan. 18) about this wetland and the beavers, and thought I would send you this photo of my children Finley, 8, and Ruby, 5, with the beaver lodge in background and their art.

My children have joined Earth Rangers along with 100,000 other children across Canada and one of their missions was to speak with an elder about living with wildlife and do an art project.

We read about how the beaver represents wisdom. The beaver uses the gifts and knowledge it was given by the Creator to build a healthy and strong community.

In that process, it makes wetland habitat so we call them wetland superheroes.

This land was taken out of the ALR with the agreement that this area would be left as green space. With all the money that the government is putting toward wetland conservation, it would be a shame to lose this wetland and the beavers that made it.

I understand that there are many other management options that people could be using other than constantly killing them.

Here is a website with some good solutions.

Melissa Oakes,

Langley Township

Langley Times

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