Canada C3 is a former Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker that sailed into Prince Rupert harbour on Sept. 29. The ship travelled across the three coasts of Canada in 150 days. (Shannon Lough / The Northern View)

Canada C3 is a former Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker that sailed into Prince Rupert harbour on Sept. 29. The ship travelled across the three coasts of Canada in 150 days. (Shannon Lough / The Northern View)

In Our Opinion: Out with the old

A reflection on industry and CEO giants that left us in 2017 and what to look forward to in 2018

There was no shortage of stories in 2017, from the highs of promised jobs with propane projects and the port expansion, to the evaporation of the LNG craze.

This was the year of clearing out the old to make space for the new. A long-time CEO stepped down, his big shoes yet to be filled, while fresh CEOs stepped up to the task in their first year.

Parks and playgrounds, Mckay Street Park, Rushbrook Trail and Mariners Park, that begged to be revitalized found the right team of volunteers to rally for the funding and jump the bureaucratic hurdles to make the projects a reality.

VIDEO and story: Rushbrook Trail upgrade trekking along

Cow Bay also saw a longer-than-anticipated beautification project come together, that should be fence-free by the spring.

There were also some darker moments, with 11 pedestrians struck by vehicles, one killed, and a tent city erected outside city hall to draw attention to the growing rates homelessness. But the silver lining was that came from the emergence of Unity City, was a new winter emergency shelter and 44 modular housing units for the homeless coming to Rupert in the new year.

READ MORE: Prince Rupert council alarmed by high number of pedestrian accidents

There is a lot to look forward to in 2018, but if anything, 2017 showed us that Prince Rupert has found its momentum to improve and rebuild.

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The Northern View