Fixation on fireworks problematic

The negative impacts of fireworks on waterfront bird life haven’t ever been the chief ecological concern

Tracy Hughes is entirely correct when she states in her Feb. 15 Observer column that fireworks on the waterfront is not a “bird-brained” idea. No, it truly isn’t.

The negative impacts of fireworks on waterfront bird life haven’t ever been the chief ecological concern – despite her persistent, incorrect emphasis that to opponents of waterfront fireworks – it is.

The potential pollution of Shuswap Lake’s freshwater ecosystems, including drinking water, by the fireworks’ witches brew fallout of metals like barium, strontium, cesium, zinc, titanium, rubidium, antimony and copper – is, however, of concern.

Such an incessant fixation on fireworks, in the face of conclusive scientific evidence of its dangers – fully documented in three previous letters to the Observer – and widespread discontinuing of fireworks in numerous North American jurisdictions is, to say the least, curious.

And, neglecting to mention established scientific data and progressive cultural practices elsewhere seems more typical of the opposition expected from evidence-ignoring, climate-change deniers.

Thus, though not a bird-brained idea, fireworks and their unacknowledged impacts definitely qualify as a harebrained idea – by definition, an idea that is ill-advised, imprudent, half-baked, unconsidered and foolhardy.

Adolph Ochs created the famous motto: All the News That’s Fit to Print for the New York Times in 1896, including the reportage that would live up to that promise.

In this era of alternate facts and fake news, readers need to be able to rely on getting all the right facts in an issue – not just a skewed few!

Thos. J. Crowley

 

Salmon Arm Observer

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