EDITORIAL: Community newspapers still relevant

The Alberni Valley News hits a milestone today, our 10th anniversary.

The Alberni Valley News hits a milestone today, our 10th anniversary.

Our first edition hit the streets in 2006, and we were a rare breed: a brand new newspaper starting from the ground up. Since then it has been a wild ride.

With the rise of social media, much has been said about the demise of newspapers.

We can assure you, we are not going anywhere.

News enterprises may be shifting the way they deliver the news, but the core product remains the same: community news, done well.

Wherever people turn to for their news—the interwebs or print, traditional newspaper or tablet—they want to read something that is presented with integrity and professionalism.

It can be difficult to weed through the countless self-interest posts that disguise themselves as ‘news’.

Journalists, who have invested in their education and training, continue to provide that balance necessary to read both sides of an issue. It is a task they take seriously.

There is a reason why community newspapers continue to prevail, despite predictions of doom: News Canada statistics show 78 per cent of Canadian adults still read the local paper every week.

While the delivery of that news continues to change, we are confident that one fact will remain the same: people want to know what is going on in their community, and they’re willing to read their community newspaper to find out.

— ALBERNI VALLEY NEWS

 

Alberni Valley News