Consideration needed for sharing forest

In the Jan 10, 2011 issue of the Times one of the letters was about the plight of the wildlife in the brushed area around the town.

In the Jan 10, 2011 issue of the Times one of the letters was about the plight of the wildlife in the brushed area around the town.

I agree with the letter’s writer, Ted Richter. We have really taken this thinning a bit to far. Oh, I know that the idea is to stop a fire from happening if someone were to throw out a cigarette, but people can’t throw a cigarette a mile!

I do agree that we need to brush the sides of the road back to help with this fire situation, and even some of the brush away from areas within the community to help keep the animals from feeling safe within town limits.

After all, who amongst you like having moose or deer walk through your yard – well, besides folk like me, who slide off and try and get the camera? And, as Ted pointed out, we are also destroying the habitat for all the woodland creatures and birds, and is that right? Humans – it’s all about humans.

Here is another thought. As I prefer to pick and use natural plants for medicine, I regularly harvest the soapberry, Saskatoon, etc. that grow in abundance within the town. They are free and enjoyable to harvest and right there for our eating pleasure. I leave some for the wildlife and I use this fruit to expel colds and the flu, and to give me energy. This year several of my prime picking areas have been brushed.

Sometimes we need to think of others when we make decision and do our work. If we were to think of how our actions, whether as an individual or a group, are going to effect our children’s children (or our neighbor’s great-grandchildren) and then make our plans … that might be a better way of ensuring there even will be a future.

I challenge all of you to get involved in the planning processes, write letters, and attend meetings. Present your side of the discussion. Maybe if we were to discuss these thoughts before we act, we might be better stewards of the earth.

There is no right or wrong here. Compromise will always be needed. Old loggers, road builders, fishermen and yes, even old housewives may not have book learning, but they have attended the school of harsh reality for a lifetime and they really do have some good points of view to consider.

Cheryl Thomas

Clearwater, B.C.

Clearwater Times

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