WildSafeBC Kimberley/Cranbrook is reporting a cougar kill site in the Kimberley Nature Park, on the Connie’s Way trail, located near the Swan Ave entrance. (WildSafeBC/Submitted file)

WildSafeBC reports cougar kill site in Kimberley Nature Park

Use extreme caution if you are walking or hiking in the area.

  • Jun. 30, 2020 12:00 a.m.

WildSafeBC Kimberley/Cranbrook is reporting a cougar kill site in the Kimberley Nature Park on the Connie’s Way trail, located near the Swan Ave. entrance.

WildSafeBC would like to remind the public that deer are one of the cougar’s primary food sources. It is important that if you are walking in the area, you keep your pets on a leash, walk with a group, carry bear spray and never feed wild animals.

“If deer are abundant in an area, then there is a good possibility to find cougars using the same area. Cougars are most active during the period from dusk until dawn and this period requires extra vigilance by hikers while in cougar country. Most of the time, cougars in conflict are usually young cougars that have not yet learned how to hunt efficiently or, are older cougars that can no longer hunt in the wilds,” says a press release from WildSafeBC.

WildSafe adds that contrary to popular belief, cougars do not pounce on their prey from overhanging rocks or trees but employ a stalk of an animal and then an explosive series of bounds to leap on their prey. Using both their razor-sharp claws and powerful jaws they can quickly kill most any prey they choose to attack. Large prey takes several days to eat, and the cougar will pull debris over the carcass to keep off scavengers. The cougar will stay near to a kill site until the prey is totally consumed.

Visit the WildSafeBC website at www.wildsafebc.com to find a map that shows where wildlife has been sighted in your community along with information about what has attracted it into the area. By knowing where wildlife is and what is bringing it in, we can all do our part to keep wildlife wild and our communities safe.

To report a cougar in conflict, sightings in urban areas or a cougar showing unusual or aggressive behaviour, call the Conservation Officer Service at 1-877-952-7277.


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