Signs that bears are around were visible Monday, June 1 at around 7:30 a.m. on South Lakeside in Williams Lake where a garbage can was overturned and its contents rummaged through. WildSafeBC has hired a new co-ordinator for the Cariboo who will be delivering programs which include managing attractants. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

WildSafeBC hires new co-ordinator for Cariboo region

Mareike Moore said the main message is keeping wildlife wild, communities safe

WildSafe BC has hired Mareike Moore of Williams Lake as its Cariboo co-ordinator.

“Last week I spent doing training through Zoom,” Moore told Black Press Media Monday.

“We learned about WildSafeBC programs but also heard from some biologists about grizzly bears and other wildlife in our area.”

From May to the end of November, she will be involved in a number of WildSafeBC modified program initiatives including door-to-door information delivery campaigns, garbage tagging, and webinar delivery of the highly requested WildSafe Ranger Program for school–aged children as well as the Wildlife Awareness and Safety Education sessions.

This week she is focusing on make connections with people in different communities across the region, which include Quesnel, 100 Mile House, Wells, Barkerville and Williams Lake.

She is also busy sharing information on the WildSafeBC Cariboo Facebook page.

Moore reminded the public that any wildlife conflicts should be reported to the Conservation Officer Service 24/7 at 1-877-952-7277 and said she will be connecting with the COS this week over the phone to find out how she can support their efforts.

“Our main message is keeping wildlife wild and communities safe,” Moore said. “It’s important that people manage their attractants so as not to attract wildlife.”

Her position, which is part-time, is funded by the Cariboo Regional District, the B.C. Conservation Foundation and the BC Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy.

After November the program goes into hibernation, Moore said, noting she will also continue to work part-time for the Cariboo Chilcotin Coast Tourism Association.

Residents can also report sightings of bear, cougar, coyote or wolf in an urban area.

These reports are uploaded daily to WildSafeBC’s Wildlife Alert Reporting Program (WARP), available at www.wildsafebc.com/warp.

This program allows the public to see what wildlife has been reported in their neighbourhood and be alerted of new sightings.

For further information on wildlife, WildSafeBC programs and how to reduce human-wildlife conflict visit www.wildsafebc.com or contact Moore at cariboo@wildsafebc.com or 250-302-2132.

Read more: Bear calls keeping new Cariboo conservation officer busy


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