Campbell River Search and Rescue responded to three hikers that were stuck on Mt. Schoen on Sunday. They used their new hoist system to successfully conduct the operation. Photo by Campbell River Volunteer Search and Rescue/Facebook

Campbell River Search and Rescue responded to three hikers that were stuck on Mt. Schoen on Sunday. They used their new hoist system to successfully conduct the operation. Photo by Campbell River Volunteer Search and Rescue/Facebook

Stranded hikers rescued by helicopter on Mt. Schoen

Campbell River Search and Rescue used hoist operation to rescue trio

  • Aug. 22, 2019 12:00 a.m.

Campbell River Search and Rescue successfully rescued three stranded hikers on Sunday.

The trio was attempting to go up Mt. Schoen, east of Woss, when they got stuck.

Campbell River SAR received the call-out shortly after 8 a.m. and, knowing the terrain was steep and challenging, flew by helicopter to attend.

The three young male hikers were uninjured, but were not able to continue their route, or to safely descend the scree field they had climbed. Scree is a form of loose rock that can slide down a slope.

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“They were uninjured, but ran into some challenging terrain, knew their limits, and stayed safe,” said a post on Campbell River Volunteer Search and Rescue Society’s Facebook page.

The group of hikers was able to get a cell phone call out to a family member who let the rescue team know about their location.

The team opted to use a hoist, said Grant Cromer, a Campbell River SAR member who was on the call.

“We deployed two technicians down on the hoist line,” he said. They were lowered one-by-one down 106 feet of the 250-foot line.

The hikers were flown off the mountain.

Cromer said that helicopter line rescues are becoming more common. Campbell River SAR has responded to four calls this year that required the skill: two in July and two so far this month.

The Campbell River Search and Rescue team is the only Vancouver Island SAR group that has the training and equipment to do Class D fixed-line helicopter operations. They received training back in May alongside Comox Valley SAR members to add hoist rescues to their toolbox. The crews have partnered with Ascent Helicopters out of Parksville.

While fixed line operations – where technicians are flown in on a fixed line, rigging and de-rigging at a different location – have been around for a while, hoist operations are relatively new. In a hoist operation, a technician is lowered on a rope from the helicopter and brought back up. Both are considered to be Class D.

RELATED: Comox Valley SAR finds hikers stranded in Strathcona Park at 4:30 a.m.

Cromer said one technique isn’t necessarily better than the other, rather it’s “what tool works best at the time.”

Cromer said one technique isn’t necessarily better than the other, rather it’s “what tool works best at the time.”

Cromer said one technique isn’t necessarily better than the other, rather it’s “what tool works best at the time.”

Campbell River Search and Rescue is reminding people to research their routes and to leave a trip plan with a responsible person before heading into the backcountry. For information on how to create a trip plan, visit adventuresmart.ca.

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