Sign installed at the Deadman’s Island to interest visitors on its history

The story of how the tiny island called the Deadman's Island, in Burns Lake, got its name, is a popular story in the area, told and retold through the years. It has almost received somewhat of a folklore status by now. However, Lynn Synotte, who is part of Lakes Outdoors Society, with the help of her husband, Norm, decided to put up a sign to explain the history behind the island and its name for locals and visitors who will paddle across to this tiny piece of land. The local Class C board responsible for managing the island has erected a sign to explain the naming. The Burns Lake Museum contributed the story of the accidental blast and the demise of rail workers laying track through the mountainous terrain. Funding for the sign was provided by the Parks Enhancement Fund. (Lynn Synotte photo/Lakes District News)

  • Oct. 7, 2020 12:00 a.m.
New signs installed on Deadman's island. (Lynn Synotte photo/Lakes District News)

New signs installed on Deadman's island. (Lynn Synotte photo/Lakes District News)

The story of how the tiny island called the Deadman’s Island, in Burns Lake, got its name, is a popular story in the area, told and retold through the years. It has almost received somewhat of a folklore status by now. However, Lynn Synotte, who is part of Lakes Outdoors Society, with the help of her husband, Norm, decided to put up a sign to explain the history behind the island and its name for locals and visitors who will paddle across to this tiny piece of land. The local Class C board responsible for managing the island has erected a sign to explain the naming. The Burns Lake Museum contributed the story of the accidental blast and the demise of rail workers laying track through the mountainous terrain. Funding for the sign was provided by the Parks Enhancement Fund. (Lynn Synotte photo/Lakes District News)

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