Hearts and rainbows decorate the home front of Ayla Hauknes (11) on April 11, as messages of love and hope during COVID-19 social distancing. More than 500 windows in Prince Rupert offer colour and rainbow resilience during the coronavirus.(Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)

Hearts and rainbows decorate the home front of Ayla Hauknes (11) on April 11, as messages of love and hope during COVID-19 social distancing. More than 500 windows in Prince Rupert offer colour and rainbow resilience during the coronavirus.(Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)

Rainbow resilience in Prince Rupert

Hearts and rainbows colour city with promises of hope and love

  • Apr. 12, 2020 12:00 a.m.

What started in early March as a thank-you tribute to healthcare workers, who work in the depths of exposure to COVID-19, has morphed into a community movement of solidarity and support through out the dark days of coronavirus. Hearts and rainbows are offering promises of hope while adorning the frontages of business and private homes world wide. These warm wished are especially bright and colourful in Prince Rupert, the City known for it’s rainbows.

Staff at The Northern View spent Easter weekend capturing on camera more than 500 Prince Rupert windows which displayed the prism of community spirit and rainbow resilience the city is known for.

What was once a days-gone-by activity, has now become a daily adventure for many families, who are practicing social distancing and self isolation. Parents and children venture out of their homes for daily walks, in family unison, around their neighbourhoods. In contrast to the age-old daily walks, modern day greetings are now offered by neighbourhood children and community members with hearts, rainbows and messages of hope being left in windows as a way of reaching out to keep a connection of humanity to those who meander by.

READ MORE: Parade of welcome and love in Prince Rupert

Juliana Hauknes was outside in her front yard, on April 11, enjoying time with her children, when The Northern View spotted their house front-window. Excited to see live people, staff took the opportunity to engage in some real-life conversation.

“I notice an influx of people out walking,” Hauknes said, from a safe distance across the street, “It’s nice to see people out taking advantage of quality family time.”

It’s boring for kids to be at home all day and not be bale to play with friends, said Ayla Hauknes.

“I felt like putting something in our window to make them feel good because I can’t talk to them in person,” Hauknes, age 11, said,”At least I can talk to them on face-time.”

Rainbow and hearts were not the only thing on the April holiday weekend to exhibit love in these times where many feel alone and isolated. A pageant of decorated vehicles with balloons and streamers drove around the west end city streets at noon honking horns, waving banners and expressing happy Easter tidings. At 7 p.m. each night emergency sirens, honking horns and ships booming can all be clearly heard in solidarity offering sound waves of hope during the turbulent tides of the strange times and in our new way of life – all to flatten the curve.

#rainbowresilienceprincerupert

READ MORE: Bunkowski’s busted out of the boredom during self isolation


K-J Millar | Journalist

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