The 152 Street overpass over Highway 99 in South Surrey was damaged in December 2017. The final repair bill was $1.254 million, according to the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure. (File photo)

The 152 Street overpass over Highway 99 in South Surrey was damaged in December 2017. The final repair bill was $1.254 million, according to the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure. (File photo)

Province to pass $1.25-million repair bill for South Surrey overpass on to ICBC

152 Street overpass was struck by overheight truck on Dec. 4, 2017

B.C. motorists may foot the bill for the repair work done to the 152 Street overpass over Highway 99, the province confirmed Friday afternoon.

The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure told Peace Arch News that the final repair bill – totalling $1.254 million – will be “submitted to ICBC in the coming days.”

The South Surrey structure was damaged Dec. 4, 2017 after being struck by an over-height truck travelling northbound on the highway.

• READ ALSO: South Surrey overpass re-opens after three months

• READ ALSO: 152 Street overpass repairs expected to cost $1.2 million

Shortly after the overpass was struck, the ministry told PAN that “extensive repairs” would be required. Repair work caused the lengthy road closures, with the overpass not fully re-opening to traffic until March of last year.

ICBC told CBC Friday that the insurer would not be attempting to seek remuneration from the driver of the truck that caused the damage. In an email to PAN late Friday, an ICBC spokesperson clarified that position, saying that “at this point it is not known whether ICBC will pay the cost of the overpass repair. That is because there is legal action underway involving the driver and several over parties.”

“If the driver is found to be at fault, ICBC would pay the repair costs stemming from the crash up to the limits of the policy.”

ICBC disputed the idea that any payment will come from taxpayers.

“To be clear, if the driver of the vehicle is found liable, any ICBC claim payments wouldn’t come from ‘taxpayers’ but from third party liability insurance coverage established to pay such claims and funded by insurance premiums.”

Charges were also laid against the truck driver by Commercial Vehicle Safety and Enforcement (CVSE), a ministry spokesperson added.

“The fine for not conforming with the required dimensions to be on the highway was $115.”

An investigation into the carrier by CVSE also found it to be “non-compliant.”

“Upon receiving the report and recommendation, the carrier decided to voluntarily surrender their certificate to operate as of Dec 20, 2017.”


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