Twin Lakes Golf Course (screen grab google maps)

Open house teed up for Twin Lakes development

Developer holding open house for controversial Twin Lakes housing project

The owner and developer of a controversial housing project at the Twin Lakes Golf Course is holding a public open house Thursday.

Suki Sekhon, owner of the Twin Lakes Golf Course, along with his Vancouver-based team from his company CRS Group of Companies, will answer questions from area residents and members of the public from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the clubhouse at the golf course.

The controversial project, which has had several owners and phases, has attracted a lot of negative feedback from area residents and those concerned about water levels in the area. The development dates back more than two decades and requires approval from provincial and local levels of government.

Sekhon brought forward a new plan in 2016 to the Regional District Okanagan-Similkameen board, which proposed a subdivision be built in multiple phases with the first including construction of 33 single family strata units and 18 multifamily strata units.

RELATED: Twin Lakes development on to the next round

RDOS directors approved a development variance permit in May 2016 reducing the amount of water needed for the first phase of the project.

Without RDOS approval of the variance from 8,000 litres for a single family unit/day to 5,500 litres the Sekhon cannot apply for a water license from the province or move forward on a zoning amendment.

The water variance first surfaced in 2012. At that time it was deferred until a hydrogeological study could be completed. The study was provided to the RDOS in January 2016.

Sekhon is currently working with RDOS staff on a zoning amendment application for the development.

Glenda Stewart-Smith, a trustee on the Lower Nipit Improvement District and owner of a property at Twin Lakes said many residents are concerned about water management in the area.

Stewart-Smith is a seasonal resident and spends most of her time in the Lower Mainland. She said she won’t be able to make the meeting.

“There’s a lot of seasonal residents who can’t make it. It’s a funny time to have it,” she said.

Stewart-Smith said she’s only been a trustee for a short time but noted that the Twin Lakes experiences a drought/flood cycle. Twin Lakes was impacted heavily by flooding this past spring.

“We’re really struggling right now that we’re going through a pattern of drought to flood. When there’s flooding all we can do is react. Eventually we can pump the water. But when there is drought there is just drought. Whey they announced the development around the golf course, I think, they were saying it was going to be 250 houses. There’s no way our lake, aquifer could support that,” she said. “I’m not opposed per say but I really want to know how the water is going to be managed.”