Credit: Contributed

Credit: Contributed

Mining led to mass production, says UBCO prof

Without destructive mining, mass production and consumption would not be possible

  • Feb. 17, 2018 12:00 a.m.

Without mass destruction mining, the mass production and consumption that became common for much of the world in the 20th century would not be possible, argues a UBCO professor.

In the early part of 20th century, construction and consumption vastly increased. In order to supply the raw materials required to feed this consumption, mining technologies had to keep pace, according to UBCO. Highly-mechanized, high-throughput, mass-destruction mining resulted, and led to surges in production which fundamentally changed landscapes, labour and ways of life in mining regions.

On Feb. 19 at 6:45 p.m. at the Okanagan Regional Library downtown, a special event organized by UBC Okanagan’s History and Sociology department, Eagle Glassheim, a professor of History at UBC, explores these changes through case studies of mining towns in Europe, Canada and the United States.

His talk will explore what the recent history of mass destruction mining reveals about connections between ourselves, the materials of our consumption, and remote mining landscapes and communities.

Join the discussion at this free, public event by registering online at massmining.eventbrite.com.

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