Const. Ken Usipiuk of the Delta Police Department vehicle inspection unit writes a ticket during the commercial vehicle enforcement blitz Sept. 25-27. (Delta Police Department photo)

Inspection blitz takes 150 commercial trucks off Delta roads

The three-day inspection looked at more than 350 vehicles, and less than 40 had no problems

Delta was home to one of B.C.’s largest commercial vehicle inspections last week, as 80 police and enforcement officers targeted more than 350 vehicles over three days.

The blitz, which took place between Sept. 25 and 27 in six places around Delta, was organized by the Delta Police Department in partnership with Commercial Vehicle Safety and Enforcement (CVSE). Over the course of the three-day inspection, the officers took nearly half of the 357 vehicles they looked at off the road.

“Officers saw a full range of issues, from minor things like a missing fuel cap, to a major steering malfunction. The whole front axle was shifting,” Const. Ken Usipiuk, a member of the DPD’s vehicle inspection unit, said in a press release.

According to Usipiuk, when officers inspected a combination vehicle, they found that steering axle was loose from the suspension. If it hadn’t been found, the driver could have lost control of the steering with potentially catastrophic consequences.

According to the DPD, 39 of the inspected vehicles passed with no defects whatsoever, while 152 required minor repairs that could be completed later. Nearly 160 vehicles required repairs that had to be completed road-side before the driver could leave.

RELATED: Delta police partner with CVSE for three-day vehicle inspection blitz

“The majority of the issues our officers spotted were tire, rim and wheel defects, braking system problems and concerns with whether cargo was properly secured,” Usipiuk said.

Officers issued 110 violation tickets, totalling more than $25,000 in fines. They also issued about $12,000 in fines for bylaw infractions.

“This was a targeted campaign focusing on vehicles that do not appear to be meeting safety regulations and standards,” Steve Bauer, deputy regional manager for CVSE, said in a press release. “Our top concern was mechanical fitness of the vehicle.”

“Drivers and those in the industry are definitely appreciative of these efforts,” Bauer added. “The overwhelming majority of vehicles are being operated in a safe and professional manner, and checks such as those we conducted last week are really about the safety of the vehicle, the driver and ultimately the public.”


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