Courtesy of the Kitsap Public Health District

Courtesy of the Kitsap Public Health District

IH reveals Kelowna spots where COVID-19 exposure may have occurred

Interior Health advises individuals they may have been exposed between June 25 to July 6

  • Jul. 13, 2020 12:00 a.m.

Interior Health (IH) announced on Sunday that further testing of people who gathered at various Kelowna locations between June 25 and July 9 has allowed their team to identify certain locations where individuals may have been exposed to COVID-19.

IH urges all visitors to the Cactus Club on Water Street from July 3 to July 6, and Pace Spin Studio on Harvey Street from July 2 to July 9, to self-monitor and get tested if they have coronavirus symptoms.

This advisory follows IH’s July 11 notice directing those who attended gatherings in downtown Kelowna, specifically at Discovery Bay Resort from July 1 to July 5 and Boyce Gyro Beach Lodge on July 1, to self-isolate.

“Public health contact tracing is under way, and where possible, IH is reaching out directly to individuals who have been exposed,” IH confirmed.

“Anyone who participated in events in the Kelowna downtown and waterfront area between June 25 and July 6 should monitor closely for symptoms of COVID-19 and get tested if they develop symptoms.”

Eight cases of COVID-19 had been identified as of July 11 related to these gatherings, six of the individuals reside outside of Interior Health.

IH said it continues to work with other jurisdictions to determine the source of disease for these cases.

Anyone who develops COVID-19 symptoms is asked to get tested for the virus.

In Trail, testing is being done at the Kiro Wellness Centre. Call 250.304.5210 for information.

Testing is not recommended for people who have no symptoms.

COVID-19 symptoms include; fever, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, loss of taste or smell.

Milder symptoms may include; runny nose, fatigue, body aches, headache, sore throat, vomiting and red eyes.

Two kinds of tests are available for COVID-19: viral tests and antibody tests.

A viral test – which involves a nasopharyngeal swab – indicates if you have a current infection.

An antibody test might tell you if you had a past infection. An antibody test might not show if you have a current infection because it can take one to three weeks after infection for your body to make antibodies.

Having antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19 might provide protection from getting infected with the virus again.

British Columbia has been home to roughly 3,053 test-positive cases of COVID-19 with an 88 per cent recovery rate. A total of 187 people have died, many of those being seniors in long-term care facilities.

Across Canada, more than 107,300 people have contracted the disease with 8,773 of those losing their lives.


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