Garlick contemplates future on council

There’s still almost two years to decide, but Coldstream’s mayor may make this his last term as top dog

Coldstream Mayor Jim Garlick may make this his last term as mayor.

Coldstream Mayor Jim Garlick may make this his last term as mayor.

There’s still almost two years to decide, but Coldstream’s mayor may make this his last term as top dog.

Jim Garlick isn’t abandoning the array of plans he has for his community, but admits he may be interested in a demotion during the October 2018 election.

“I think what I should do is run as a council member, if the residents will have me, to have that continuity,” said Garlick, who is currently in his third term as mayor (and has previously served on council).

And he’s not afraid of the competition, in fact, he encourages it.

“I’d hate to see an election where you don’t have enough people running and with this four-year-term I see this happening.”

The husband and father of two teenage kids, spends much of his time in the classroom as a secondary school teacher. Aside from his family and teachings, his other job is at the helm in Coldstream.

The forward-thinking mayor isn’t one to sit idly by, watching his community become stagnant. He’s worked tirelessly on various projects and initiatives both locally and regionally.

With the new rail trail making tracks in Coldstream, plans are underway to facilitate the additional amenity.

Coldstream recently purchased a two-hectare lot on Kalamalka Road next to the Alpine Centre for rail trail parking.

“I’d like to see some commercial component to it as well,” said Garlick.

Using the Alexander’s liquor store site as an example, Garlick says they could fit three building the size of the store on that property plus 150 parking spaces. Development there would also lead to an intersection at Guildford Court.

As Coldstream looks at this and other growing trends such as mobile vendors and airbnbs, it is also updated some antiquated plans.

Staff and council recently finished the Official Community Plan and are now looking at rewriting the zoning bylaw.

“It’s been around for decades,” said Garlick of the amendment-riddled document.

Plans for replacement of the Women’s Institute Hall are also at the drawing board.

“We need to look at what it is we want there, how big it would be and cost for it,” said Garlick, suggesting residents could be voting twice in 2018. “If we were to go to referendum what would it cost.”

But Garlick’s focus extends beyond the Coldstream borders, as several regional issues weigh on his mind.

He is eager to continue growth with Greater Vernon’s master water plan.

“We spent all that time and effort at the beginning of 2016 with the stakeholders committee but it kind of died,” said the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee member.

“Where are we going? What direction are we going?”

Regionally, Garlick is pleased to see the new arena plans building, which will compliment the region’s other facilities such as the Greater Vernon Athletics Park which Coldstream looks after.

“Anything we can get accomplished that’s sitting on the back burner is good.”

Vernon Morning Star

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