From the archives of the 100 Mile Free Press

From the archives of the 100 Mile Free Press

37 Years Ago (1982): The office of the provincial ombudsman was recommending the Workers' Compensation Board (WCB) reduce its contribution assessment rating of 100 Mile Freed and Ranch. The ombudsman was the latest in a string of events involving a dispute between the firm and the WCB that had begun two years prior. Owner Frank Dobbs Jr. sued the WCB after being unsuccessful in having his rate reduced from $3.80 per $100 in wages paid to his employees to 50 cents, contending that his business was unfairly assessed by the board.

37 Years Ago (1982): The office of the provincial ombudsman was recommending the Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB) reduce its contribution assessment rating of 100 Mile Freed and Ranch. The ombudsman was the latest in a string of events involving a dispute between the firm and the WCB that had begun two years prior. Owner Frank Dobbs Jr. sued the WCB after being unsuccessful in having his rate reduced from $3.80 per $100 in wages paid to his employees to 50 cents, contending that his business was unfairly assessed by the board.

25 Years Ago (1994): The South Cariboo received some of the highest property tax assessments in the central interior. More than a few owners had their breath taken away when they opened assessment notices with increases of anywhere from 50 to 90 per cent. Area assessor Gordon Stadel reported that residential property values in 100 Mile House generally increased 15 to 25 per cent. Rural surrounding areas generally went up between 20 and 30 per cent. Green Lake Ratepayers Association president Dennis Tupman said his phone hadn’t stopped ringing with “shocked and furious residents.”

22 Years Ago (1997): The South Cariboo Recreation Commission intended to hold meetings in areas outside its existing taxation area to discuss the possibility of expanding the recreation tax base. The consensus was that no one wanted a repeat of the problems that arose around the 1993 pool referendum when there was little consistency in the information presented from meeting to meeting. The meetings would focus not only on the future of the Stan Halcro Arena but on access to the commission’s recreational programs, properties and financial support.

18 Years Ago (2001): The South Cariboo Arts and Culture Society wanted a 10-year, no-rent agreement for the Parkside Centre for Arts and Culture, but Mayor Donna Barnett said the agreement couldn’t be handled like that. “A long-term, rent free agreement in lieu of financial assistance would be acceptable,” said Ronnie Forcier, president of the society in a letter to council. Barnett said the Local Government Act forbade leases longer than five years and that council wanted to monitor it on a year-to-year basis. “The council at this point has no problem in forgiving their $1,000 monthly fee.”

9 Years Ago (2010): The siting of the pool facility raised the most questions, especially the suggestion of replacing the Agriplex. Carmen Wannop wanted to know why the steering committee was considering building on a site where there was already a building (the Agriplex) instead of building on the other side. Consultant Bruce Carscadden said there was and opportunity because that building was “coming to the end of its life” and that would be the preferred site. If it was still in use, Wannop suggested it would be cheaper to build elsewhere rather than pay more to tear the building down.

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