The lighthouse at Friendly Cove. (Wikimedia commons)

Friendly Cove and Kyuquot will remain closed until further notice

Transition of other B.C. communities will be monitored before a decision to ease restrictions

  • Jun. 2, 2020 12:00 a.m.

Friendly Cove (Yuquot) and Kyuquot will remain closed to outsiders until further notice said their respective First Nations.

The Kyuquot/Chechlesat First Nation (KCFN) and the Mowachaht/ Muchalaht First Nation (MMFN) have said that these spots located along the west coast of Vancouver Island will remain closed as they monitor the transition of other communities that are slowly emerging from closures and restrictions.

Cynthia Blackstone, chief administrative officer of KCFN, said that they will maintain the border closure they imposed in April to “continue to protect their people.”

Blackstone also said that they want to wait and observe as B.C. slowly begins to restart and reopen places.

“We’re still not out of the woods,” said Blackstone with regards to the COVID-19 pandemic. And with the possibility of an outbreak persisting, the First Nation wants to be cautious about opening Kyuquot’s borders.

Although members are restless as they enter the third month of lockdown, they understood the need for border closure and continue to cooperate. She also said that the community has access to supplies and has been ordering food and groceries every two weeks.

On May 25, MMFN announced that Friendly Cove (Yuquot), will remain closed to “all persons and all forms of transportation.”

Moorage at the dock at Friendly Cove is also prohibited.

Earlier in May, MMFN also restricted access to their boat launch located near Gold River for outsiders, following inquiries for permissions. The restrictions do not apply to members of MMFN, Gold River Residents and medical and emergency personnel.

MMFN’s boat ramp is the main access point to Muchalat Inlet and Nootka Sound that attracts boaters from other parts of Vancouver Island, B.C., Alberta, the rest of Canada, and the US.

Kevin Kowalchuk, chief administrator of MMFN, explained in a notice that the “primary focus” of the closure was to minimize the risk of COVID-19.

Both First Nations have indicated that they will continue to monitor the situation and will remove restrictions only when it is safe to do so.

READ ALSO : Isolated B.C. First Nation seeks further seclusion in response to COVID-19

READ ALSO: As SD84 schools look to reopen, Kyuquot and Zeballos opt out

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