Clinton cadet gets senior appointment

Army Cadet Alysha Milward appointed Company Sergeant Major of Alpha Company.

Cadet Master Warrant Officer Alysha Milward of Clinton (centre) is appointed to Company Sergeant Major of Alpha Company at Vernon Cadet Training Centre by the Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Judy Peter (r). Taking part in the presentation is Major Dick Derkson, Officer Commanding, Alpha Company (l).

Cadet Master Warrant Officer Alysha Milward of Clinton (centre) is appointed to Company Sergeant Major of Alpha Company at Vernon Cadet Training Centre by the Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Judy Peter (r). Taking part in the presentation is Major Dick Derkson, Officer Commanding, Alpha Company (l).

Army Cadet Alysha Milward of Clinton was appointed Company Sergeant Major of Alpha Company, becoming one of only eight senior cadet appointments at the Vernon Cadet Training Centre. Alpha Company is one of six at the camp, consisting of courses in Drill and Ceremonial as well as Sports and Fitness.

Cadet Master Warrant Officer (C/MWO) Milward was appointed to her position based on her previous successes both during summer training and at her home corps, as well as her results during an intense four-day training and evaluation period for all VCTC staff cadets. She looks forward to participating in the training centre’s Sunset Parade, which is open to the public on August 13.

C/MWO Milward plans to attend Thompson Rivers University this year. Her previous cadet training includes an exchange to the Cayman Islands and two years at summer training centres. She looks forward to the training of her cadets. In her spare time she is an amateur photographer, enjoys horseback riding, and is part of a 4H club.

The VCTC is the oldest continuous army cadet summer training centre in Canada. Each summer more than 1,000 cadets from across western Canada take part in of the may courses offered there.

The Cadet Program is a national program designed for young Canadians aged 12 to 18 who are interested in learning new skills, experiencing adventurous activities, undertaking national or international expeditions, travel, and making new friends from across the country while participating in a variety of fun, challenging, and rewarding activities.

They also learn about the sea, army, and air activities of the Canadian Armed Forced. Cadets make valuable contributions to Canadian society on a daily basis in terms of environmental, citizenship, and community activities. Cadets also learn valuable life and work skills such as teamwork, leadership, and citizenship.

Nationally, more than 55,000 cadets in approximately 1,115 army, sea and air cadet units make up the largest federally sponsored youth program in the country.

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Ashcroft Cache Creek Journal