Cranbrook business and property owners are encouraged to flush their water lines ahead of reopening. All it takes is running the cold water tap for several minutes. (Cranbrook Townsman file)

City of Cranbrook encourages property owners to flush water lines ahead of reopening

Many local businesses and buildings have been closed or vacant for the past several months

  • May. 22, 2020 12:00 a.m.

The City of Cranbrook is encouraging property and business owners to flush stagnant water from their pipes if their buildings have been vacant, or have had low occupancy for the last several months. This notice comes as many businesses and buildings set plans in motion to reopen as part of the second phase of the BC Restart Plan.

“It’s as simple as running your cold water taps for several minutes,” said the City in a press release. “The City of Cranbrook works hard to provide potable drinking water to all local customers, but it is important for property or business owners to ensure water within their buildings is fresh and clean for themselves, customers and tenants.”

The Canadian Water and Wastewater Association (CWWA) has a full set of guidelines, available online, for property and business owners to find out more information.

“When buildings are closed or on low occupancy for any prolonged period, water in the building becomes stagnant and can post serious health risks,” says the CWWA fact sheet. “Harmful microbiological and chemical contaminants can grow or leach into water supply.”

The CWWA adds that the effect of stagnation will vary depending on the length of shutdown, size of building, number of occupants, complexity of the system and more.

“Now, as Canadian provinces and territories begin to lift restrictions, and communities prepare to reopen public spaces, we need all building owners and operators to be aware of issues that could threaten the safety of the water and sewer services in their building,” says the CWWA.

Other resources include the Legionella Control (www.cdc.gov.legionella/downloads/toolkit.pdf), Water Management Plans (https://www.cdc.gov/legionella/wmp/toolkit/index.html), IAPMO (https://www.iapmo.org/media/) and the Pool Water Advisory Group (https://www.pwtag.org/guidance-on-temporary-pool-closure/). Cranbrook residents can call 311 for more information as well.

READ MORE: City of Cranbrook advises residents to protect properties from flooding

READ MORE: RDEK sets up self-fill sandbag stations across the region


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