A motorcycle instructor going through a traffic cone course. (Photo courtesy of BC Traffic Services)

B.C. Traffic Services reminds drivers to share the road with motorcyclists

36 riders are killed in 2,400 crashes involving motorcycles on B.C. roads every year

  • Apr. 18, 2021 12:00 a.m.

Every spring and summer brings out more vehicles travelling on B.C.’s roadways, including motorcycles. BC RCMP Traffic Services would like to remind motorists to be aware of motorcyclists this season and follow a few easy rules to keep everyone safe on streets and highways.

According to provincial data, motorcycles make up approximately 3.5 per cent of insured vehicles on the roads, yet they make up more than 10 per cent of total roadway fatalities. According to an ICBC study, on average, 36 riders are killed in 2,400 crashes involving motorcycles on B.C. roads every year.

As a police officer, a professional motorcycle rider and one who rides personally, I know all too well the dangers motorcyclists face on a daily basis, said Sgt. Bryan Fedirchuk, E Division’s lead motorcycle instructor, in a public release. I urge all motorcycle operators to take training, heed the rules of the road and ride defensively – your safety depends on you.

READ MORE: Motorcyclist dies after crash on the old Island Highway in Nanaimo

Police would like to remind motorcyclists about legislation in the Motor Vehicle Act with respect to helmets and seating:

Motorcycle riders and passengers are required to wear Snell, ECE or DOT compliant helmets; and seating laws require motorcycle riders to keep their feet placed on the foot pegs or floorboards or be seated in a sidecar. Violation of seating requirements will be treated as stunt riding and will result in motorcycle impoundment and fines. Impoundment is mandatory.

Drivers sharing the road with motorcycles can help prevent a crash by following these easy tips:

• Scan intersections carefully and take an extra moment to look for motorcycles when you’re turning left;
• Stay alert and avoid distractions that take your mind off driving or your eyes off the road;
• Allow at least three or four seconds of following distance when behind a motorcycle and plenty of lane space when you pass; and
• Be ready to yield as a motorcycle is often closer than it seems. Remember it can be hard to tell how fast they’re travelling

In regions of the province where motorcycles are prevalent, motorcyclists may expect to see police checking riders and machines for licensing and safety compliance in an effort to keep them safe and reduce incidents on our roadways.

– NEWS Staff

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