LifeLabs laboratory assistant Robin Pambrun (left) and branch supervisor Laura Scheller (right) in celebrated Aldergrove’s latest accessibility achievement. (Sarah Grochowski photo)

LifeLabs laboratory assistant Robin Pambrun (left) and branch supervisor Laura Scheller (right) in celebrated Aldergrove’s latest accessibility achievement. (Sarah Grochowski photo)

Aldergrove business first to be recognized for its accessibility

One Aldergrove business is the first to be recognized by the Rick Hansen Foundation (RHF) for its accessibility for those with disabilities.

  • Nov. 13, 2019 12:00 a.m.

One Aldergrove business is the first to be recognized by the Rick Hansen Foundation (RHF) for its accessibility for those with disabilities.

The LifeLabs’ patient service centre (PSA) – where medical tests are carried out at the initial recommendation of a doctor – is part of a larger Canadian-owned company.

Its Aldergrove location was recently awarded a 69 per cent rating for a Rick Hansen Foundation Accessibility Certification (RHFAC), which only eight other LifeLabs PSA’s in the Lower Mainland possess.

The centre was first located on the 27100-block of Fraser Highway in Aldergrove five years ago.

After its move to 26310 Fraser Hwy. in 2014, its unit underwent extensive renovations.

Aldergrove’s LifeLabs branch supervisor Laura Scheller is pleased that there is a greater ease for patrons coming inside.

Scheller said the branch requires no elevator- or stair-access and at “another location patients might need help getting inside.”

RHF officials mentioned the light wall colour and dark doorway paint trimming that the centre has is specifically helpful for patients with visions difficulties because “they can see where the openings are,” Scheller retold.

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Other features of the recognized centre includes its “combo room” where laboratory technicians can perform tests on patients using a wheelchair, its wide hallways, height-accessible reception counter, and clear signage. 

LifeLabs laboratory assistant Robin Pambrun has worked at the centre for three years.

Pambrun makes use of an adjustable table which she can “slide right up to patients” located anywhere inside the centre, if patients are not able to access their a phlebotomy cubicles.

“With the table they are able to put their arm right out” for blood tests, Pambrum added.

Rick Hansen Foundation guided LifeLabs on a pilot project this year to help gauge and further suggest improvements to their centres’ functionality for those with disabilities.

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RHFAC measures accessibility to certain environments based upon the experience of people with varying disabilities that affect their mobility, vision, and hearing.

“One in seven Canadian adults currently lives with a mobility, vision, or hearing disability,” its website states.

There are a few things we need to improve, so we’re going to use them in our future renovation,” a LifeLabs spokesperson said to the Aldergrove Star.

The branch also trained its staff to be able to participate in Canada’s first-ever Serving Patients With Autism program.

LifeLabs is a Canadian-owned business that has been in operation for nearly 50 years.

Aldergrove Star

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