Time to take a look back

Every Friday we feature Valley history taken from our back issues.

ONCE UPON A TIME, Wharf Street in Comox looked just like this. Photo courtesy Comox Archives and Museum

ONCE UPON A TIME, Wharf Street in Comox looked just like this. Photo courtesy Comox Archives and Museum

Every Friday we feature Valley history taken from our back issues.

Five years ago this week in the Comox Valley Record:

Courtenay’s Deanna Howell received a Distinguished Alumna Award from Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, from where she obtained a social service worker diploma.

Howell fell ill in 1995 with fibromyalgia, forcing her to leave her job and retrain, taking one course at a time in the diploma program. She also volunteered with different health organizations. That same year, she founded the Shuswap Fibromyalgia Self-Help group.

Ten years ago this week in the Comox Valley Record:

Traffic changes around 17th and Cliffe were expected to ease congestion and increase driver safety. The City of Courtenay, province and ICBC were to cost-share the $420,000 upgrading project that included widening the west side of Cliffe between 18th and 19th to form an additional lane.

Two lanes would soon be able to turn south from the 17th Avenue Bridge onto Cliffe.

Fifteen years ago this week in the Comox Valley Record:

The campaign race began in the Comox Valley.

When nominations closed, 74 candidates were running for 33 seats in the Cumberland, Comox, Courtenay, regional district, school board and Islands Trust elections. Each term was three years. No one was elected by acclamation.

In Cumberland and Courtenay, mayors Harvey Brown and Ron Webber had to work to regain office as they each had opponents. Comox Mayor Alicia Burns did not run for a third term.

Twenty years ago this week in the Comox Valley Record:

Cumberland’s own cop shop was to open its doors at 2722 Dunsmuir Ave. this month, Mayor Bill Moncrief announced.

A joint effort by the Village and RCMP, Moncrief predicted the office would increase police presence in Cumberland.

Staffed by volunteers, the office would enable police to spend more time in Cumberland by giving them a local place to do paperwork.

Twenty five years ago this week in the Comox Valley Record:

More than $450 million was to be spent over the next decade to improve the Island Highway and construct an inland route, Premier Bill Vander Zalm promised at a campaign speech at the Westerly Hotel.

Improvements worth $100 million were to begin immediately while construction of a $350-million inland route would begin later, once the communities agree on its location.

The inland route was to begin with a $60-million Nanaimo bypass to stretch 20 km from south of Nanaimo to the four-lane road to the north.

 

Comox Valley Record

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