Plenty of history at Lone Butte

Things to do in Lone Butte

Lone Butte's Water Tower Park harkens back to the role the railway played in building the community.

Lone Butte's Water Tower Park harkens back to the role the railway played in building the community.

Once a town larger than 100 Mile, Lone Butte is situated on Highway 24, nine kilometres east from Highway 97.

Lone Butte was known as the railroad centre for the area, and hosts one of the few remaining water towers left in British Columbia, which was used during the steam-engine days.

Water Tower Park is “downtown,” where visitors can enjoy a picnic. There is also a restored speeder shed, a children’s play area and public washrooms.

Lone Butte is also home to a Cold War-era bomb shelter built in the late 1950s. It’s in the yard of Alice Singleton Heritage House (future museum), just a couple of blocks west of the water tower park.

The town was named for the butte, which overlooks the area. Visitors are welcome to climb the butte, and the view is fantastic.

The road up to the butte is the first left past the Horse Lake Connector. You will drive by the Lone Butte Cemetery, where many of the area’s pioneers were buried.

Irish Lake sits just below the butte and has a small recreational site.

There are regular craft fairs held at the community hall during the spring and summer.

The second annual Lone Butte Rocks Day is on June 18, and will have local arts and crafts, garage sales, bake sales, barbecues, and entertainment throughout the town, from the community hall to the fire hall.

For more information on events in this area, pick up a copy of the 100 Mile House Free Press or go to the Free Press website at www.100milefreepress.net.

 

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