Two shows, 10 characters, one man

Chase Padgett is bringing his guitar-based character work to the Dream Café with two very different performances.

Two shows, 10 characters, one man



Chase Padgett is bringing 10 musical characters to the Dream Café over the course of two nights.

Padgett is bringing back his Six Guitars show, which explores six very different guitarists across different genres as characters Padgett brings to life on stage.

For the first time in Penticton, Padgett is bringing Nashville Hurricane, a four-character, one-man show featuring the manager, mentor and mother of the titular guitar prodigy — a fictitious guitar hero from the late ‘70s Nashville music scene.

“In many ways it’s a commentary of my relationship with entertainment,” Padgett said. “It’s not an easy life, you’ve got to love it.”

The guitarist struggles between his love of music and a disenfranchised take on performing, being forced to hit the stage to provide for his mother.

“While that’s not exactly my life, there are times where I wish it was still mostly a passion and not a job as much,” Padgett said.

Padgett was quick to note that he does love what he does for a living.

“The arc of the show reflects that,” Padgett said. “Let’s be very honest, my life is a miracle and it’s rife with blessings. (The show) is a lot about the dark side of show business and what drives people to be on the stage. Are they doing it for fame? Or are they doing it because they really love it.”

Padgett’s performances explore a unique intersection of character work and musical performance, drawing off a background of improv performing at the SAK Comedy Lounge in Orlando, Fl. where Wayne Brady of Whose Line is it Anyway? fame got his start.

“I loved the games that we did that focused on character monologues. Those were always my favourite,” Padgett said.

He can remember a pivotal moment when he was younger, seeing a one-man show that sparked his interest in character work.

“I can’t remember the name of the performer, but I can remember flashes of it and being wowed that someone could be in front of an audience and entertain them without having to do stand-up. Just doing different characters,” Padgett said.

While doing improv, Padgett also worked on a music degree focused on guitar playing. He ended up merging the two passions into one.

“I just wanted to challenge myself to come up with something that kind of used the interests and strengths that I’d had for a few years at that point,” Padgett said. “That’s what really caused Six Guitars to happen.”

Nashville Hurricane builds on Six Guitars. While the six different guitar players never really connect their stories, the characters in Nashville Hurricane all relate to the same narrative.

“In Nashville Hurricane, they are all telling the same story, but from their side of what happened,” Padgett said.

Many fans have approached Padgett after his performances looking for some music to take home. While Padgett doesn’t have any albums, he is working on it.

“The fact that I don’t have it is less a testament to the show’s integrity as a theatrical conceit, but more a testament to just how damn lazy I’ve gotten,” Padgett laughed.

However if he does go forward with making an album, it won’t be thematically linked to the Six Guitars.

“I’ve never really found the desire to make that album. I’ve only found the desire to make that show and I’m at a point now where it’s time to make that album, but it will have nothing to do with Six Guitars or Nashville Hurricane,” Padgett said. “The short answer is I don’t (have an album), but I intend to.”

He is currently ruminating about putting out a gospel album with a bit of a twist.

“You don’t really hear gospel music for atheists,” Padgett said. “I’m going to make  gospel songs for atheists. I think it will be kind of a funny intellectual thread.”

Padgett brings Nashville Hurricane to the Dream Café on Dec. 2 and Six Guitars on Dec. 3. Show-only tickets are $40, dinner and show tickets are $80.

 

Penticton Western News

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