The screen is about to turn green at Sustainability Film Festival

The Sustainable Film Fest features a different film every Thursday in February from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at the Vernon library. Admission is free.

A documentary film festival on sustainable living is about to start in Vernon.

The Sustainable Film Fest features a different film every Thursday in February from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at the Vernon library. Admission is free.

Sponsored by the Sustainable Environment Network Society (SENS), Okanagan Regional Library and Regional District of the North Okanagan (RDNO), everyone is welcome to view the documentaries and take part in a discussion with local experts after.

Feb. 4 is Aina: That Which Fees Us, a  doc on environmental and health problems faced by the Hawaiian island of Kaua’i, complete with suggestions for solutions. Attendees will also get a sneak preview of a British documentary partly filmed in Vernon last summer.

Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story, Feb. 11, features filmmakers Jenny Rustemeyer and Grant Baldwin, who look at the billions in food waste from farms, food stores and even their own fridge. They pledge to live waste free by surviving on discarded food (no grocery shopping or eating in restaurants) and what they find is truly shocking.

How To Change The World, Feb. 18, is about how Greenpeace and the modern green movement started, complete with action video from early ventures, Greenpeace’s growing pains, and how members balanced political and personal problems. The film features Greenpeace co-founder Bill Darnell, who now lives in Vernon.

Feb. 25, Living Small: A Tiny House Documentary features Anderson Page as he faces the challenges and rewards of building his own tiny(ish) living space. The film asks “can you live more with less?”

 

Vernon Morning Star

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