Revelstoke metal artist Julie James will present a series of new works at the Revelstoke Visual Arts Centre show.

Revelstoke metal artist Julie James will present a series of new works at the Revelstoke Visual Arts Centre show.

Metal artist Julie James featured in spring Revelstoke Visual Arts Centre show

Metal clay exhibit explore the detritus of consumerism to forge jewellery synthesizing deconstructed components

Talented and thoroughly creative Revelstoke metal artist Julie James will debut her series New Works at the May 10 to June 7 exhibition at the Revelstoke Visual Arts Centre.

The Lower Mainland native relocated from Fort McMurray to Revelstoke last summer, bringing along extensive experience in ceramics and jewellery design and creation.

James holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Emily Carr University and worked as a potter for years, understudying with Galiano-based master potter Sandra Dolph. James made the switch to jewellery several years ago.

Her exhibit was prepared as part of an application for a Master of Fine Arts program. James uses metal clays extensively to create her works. Developed in Japan, the metal clay is a plastic, clay-like material that hardens into silver when fired.

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PHOTO: What do you see here? An old plastic label gun? This necklace and pendant was created using a deconstructed label gun. Its parts were used to form moulds to create impressions. The work was then recombined. contributed photo

“I rummage through the excess of human consumption,” explained James during an interview in her studio at the Revelstoke Visual Arts Centre.

She based her designs on impressions taken from found objects, such as an old plastic Mastermind game, a label-making gun, a 1920 Underwood typewriter and a hot water bottle.

“Every little element is considered,” she said. “My dedication is so fierce to what I’m doing. To me, being right is not about being laissez-faire about my designs.”

Take the Mastermind piece, for example. The swirly company logo anchors a complex necklace that also features imprints of the peg board and little silver pegs moulded from the game pieces. The object is disassembled and reassembled into a new creation.

Likewise, the Underwood typewriter is pulled apart into hundreds of pieces, its elements used to create text-based creations designed “to remind people about what’s really important in life.”

Visit Julie James online at www.juliejamesstudio.com or see her works for sale at Revelstoke jewellery store Garnish at 118 Mackenzie Ave.

The exhibits opening reception is on Friday, May 10 at 6 p.m.

 

 

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