Sports

COLUMN: Playing out from the back

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by Brett Adams

Nelson Star Contributor

Hello everyone and welcome to the fourth edition of the monthly Coach’s Corner.

This month’s clinic we addressed the themes “playing out from the back” and “preparing your team for game day.”

I would like to thank the coaches who attended the clinic. We had around 30 coaches attend and this was the biggest turn out Nelson Youth Soccer has ever had.

 

Playing out from the back

Why do we play out form the back?

To build up the play;

To start attacks form deep;

To encourage players to get on the ball;

To be a more rounded passing team;

To play a possession game — keeping the ball;

Invites the other team to press.

 

How do we play out from the back?

Goal keeper looks to play early either with feet or rolling it out;

The two fullbacks split wide and go high;

The two center backs split the box;

Holding midfielder drops into the space to receive;

Two attacking midfielders move up the field;

The wide forwards go high and wide, then look to took in to create space for the attacking full back;

The central attacker stays between the two opposing center backs;

Players must not take their eye off the ball and do not turn their back;

They need to receive on the back foot;

Look to play forward through the thirds:

In order to be successful at playing out from the back you have to be patient and give the players a chance to gain confidence from playing that way.

The other part of the clinic we looked at “How do you prepare your team for game day.”

 

Preparing your team for game day

Leading up to the game — In your training;

Be consistent with your message in training;

Be clear in what you expect from the team;

What formations are you playing? Do the players understand?

Do they know what they are doing in possession?

Do they know what they need to do out of possession?

Set plays — (Older group) Do they know what they are doing?

What is your strategy — Keep it simple.

 

Day of the game

Relax the players — allow them to enjoy what lies ahead;

Go over your points with the players;

Keep it short. Don’t bore the players;

Tell them what they do in possession and what they do out of possession;

Don’t get over anxious — the players react to the coaches mood;

Make the warm up fun/lively and vibrant — no stoppages its not a coaching session;

Still encourage that winning mentality. No one ever goes out to lose.

During the Game

Stay calm! You don’t need to pace the sidelines and kick every ball;

Give clear information;

Get your points across in short bursts;

Don’t over complicate it;

Reinforce the message —  in possession and out of possession.

 

Half Time

Brief review of the first half;

What do we need to improve on;

What are we going to do in the second;

What are we doing in and out of possession;

Be firm if you need to be, but fair;

Make them listen to what you want them to do;

Ask the questions before they go back out;

Remind them you want full commitment;

Go out and enjoy it.

 

After the game

Keep it short again;

Concentrate on the things that they have done well;

Talk about individual performances if they have been very good, don’t continually pick the same player;

If you feel stressed about the result then keep it brief and revisit it the first training session back —things seem a lot better when you have had time to think.

I hope this has been useful if you require any information on any of the above or soccer in general then please don’t hesitate to send me an email.

 

— Brett Adams is Head Coach at the Prospect Kootenay Academy, a Vancouver Whitecaps training program. The Coach’s Corner appears monthly in this space. Contact Adams at badams@whitecapsfc.com.

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