Letters

Letter: Candidate should let God speak for Himself

To the editor:

There are many church going Christian men and women in politics at all levels at the present time. Some are our own local representatives.

Notable figures from the past include J.S. Woodsworth and Tommy Douglas on the left and the Alberta Manning family on the right.

Important values and qualities that we admire like honesty, integrity, unselfishness, loyalty and courage are instilled by the Christian and other religions; such qualities didn’t just appear in our Canadian culture out of nowhere.

The legacy of Christian churches is a positive one in education, medical care and in such charitable social agencies like Salvation Army, Kelowna Gospel mission, Young Life, The Y and others.

But it seems to me that the contributions these good people made, whether politicians, ministers ot care workers came from persistent, dedicated work and not from any special insight about ‘God’s plan.’

On occasion a brave Christian politician has fought a great evil and won (think Wilberforce and the slave trade) but this is rare and the maxim that politics is the ‘art of the possible’ remains.

So, Mr. Row, persuade us with your policy agenda and with your skills as a negotiator. God will speak for Himself.

Al Hiebert,

Kelowna

 

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