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Nanaimo students develop business accumen through program

Owen Johnson, a Grade 6 student at Pleasant Valley Elementary, shows off a bracelet he made as part of the PowerPlay Young Entrepreneurs event. Students developed business plans and products, which were sold to other students. - KARL YU/The News Bulletin
Owen Johnson, a Grade 6 student at Pleasant Valley Elementary, shows off a bracelet he made as part of the PowerPlay Young Entrepreneurs event. Students developed business plans and products, which were sold to other students.
— image credit: KARL YU/The News Bulletin

Students at Pleasant Valley Elementary School were all business last week, thanks to the PowerPlay Young Entrepreneurs program.

The program allows students to develop their entrepreneurial skills and conceive business concepts. Sara Craven, a Grade 6/7 teacher, said her students worked for six weeks to develop a business plan and create products that were marketed and sold to schoolmates.

Sofina and Owen Johnson, twin siblings, sold duct tape wallets and leather bracelets, respectively, and it was a chance to apply what they learned.

“We added up all the materials. How much they cost and debated on how much ... I decided to sell [my wallets] for $4,” said Sofina Johnson, when asked about how she decided on pricing.

“We're learning about how to run our own business and how to handle money. It's pretty cool,” said Owen Johnson, when asked about on the educative aspect of the project.

Carlena Walton, another student, decided to decrease the price of her bath bombs, which fizz up when dropped in the bathtub, after seeing business was slow. The original retail price was $3.

“They're pretty big, so I thought I should put them at least at a high price, but I'm changing them for $2 now,” said Walton.

Craven said the program is neat as it encompasses a number of aspects that will benefit students.

“First they have to set goals. They go out and they interview and survey kids in the school to find out if they're on the right track for the products that they're making. Then there's a lot of math that's involved and putting together their business plan and deciding on what a proper price to sell their product is.

“And then just the fun of being creative and making something,” said Craven.

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