News

Do you know this alleged robber?

Mounties request public help in finding this suspect in the March holdup of Duncan
Mounties request public help in finding this suspect in the March holdup of Duncan's Thrifty Foods.
— image credit: Courtesy RCMP

A tattooed, slim, middle-age man is the suspect described by police in the March robbery of Duncan's Thrifty Foods.

North Cowichan/Duncan RCMP issued a sketch of the alleged thief Friday.

"An older man, with knife in hand, approached a Thrifty employee and demanded cash," reads a release from Cpl. Krista Hobday about the 3:15 p.m. March 31 robbery.

"The man walked up to the counter and pushed an empty bag towards her, demanding cash. The employee remained calm and complied, having seen the knife and believing the man was serious.

"The man quickly exited the store but not before his image was captured on video surveillance. The employee alerted other staff members and called 911."

Mounties are asking for public assistance in identifying the man depicted as Caucasian, 55 to 60 years old, with grey hair and a slender build, wearing a Tilley hat, shorts, and a short-sleeve

shirt. A tattoo can be seen on his upper right arm.

Call the North Cowichan/Duncan RCMP at 250-748-5522, or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

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