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Author raising alarms about wireless radiation

William Thomas -
William Thomas
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Alleged dangers posed by Telus cell towers and BC Hydro smart meters will be presented during Friday's presentation by two energy researchers at Cowichan Station's HUB Centre.

Hornby islander Will Thomas — author of Dialing Our Cells: Cell Phone Health Hazards — and building biologist Katarina Gustav lead the info-session Wireless: Should We Worry?

The answer, Thomas said, is "yes" when it comes to wireless technology and appliances such as cell phones, cordless phone cradles, laptop computers, and much more.

"It's 'I'm connected, therefore I am' is the current philosophy. But the weight of evidence says 'Yes, we should be paying attention,' and so should our governments and health authorities, who've remained clueless about the dangers," he said.

Cowichanian Dorothea Banman helped set up Friday's session because of her fears about possible risks posed by three cell towers targeted for Cobble Hill near RONA, Westholme, and near Dinter's Nursery.

"Microwave energy has an effect on everybody's system," she said of cell towers. "My daughter had insulin diabetes that wasn't explainable in Surrey, other than lots of wires around. Once we got out of there she finally got her normal blood sugar."

Thomas called wireless gadgets very addictive.

"Leading researchers are worried we're drowning in a sea of microwaves. If we could see the multiple layers of electro-magnetic pollution as smoke, we'd be horrified and demand cessation of this radiation.

"Sweden has seen skyrocketing illness from cancers to Alzheimer's ... this is where we're headed in Canada," he said, warning wireless radiation can penetrate a child's brain and cause learning disabilities and more.

"Remove cell towers from all neighbourhoods, and school zones. We'd better take another look at this while we still have time."

 

Your ticket:

What: Wireless; Should We Worry?

When: Friday, Nov. 30, 7 p.m.

Where: HUB Centre, Koksilah Road, Cowichan Station

 

Telus towing national safety line about cell towers

Electro-magnetic fields created by your home refrigerator's motor are greater than from a local Telus cell tower.

That's the verdict from Jim Johannsson as he addressed Cowichanians' concerns about radiation from towers and wireless appliances.

"We follow the regulations laid out by Health Canada. We don't create those standards; we follow them strictly to the letter of the law."

He noted Health Canada's code 6 "is identical to International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection standards used across Europe."

"As a  general rule, power coming from a cellphone antennae is typically hundreds or thousands of times lower than limits set by Health Canada.

"Though poles are tall, the antennas are very low power; less power than a reading lamp in your home," he said, declining to further field specifics about cell-tower fears.

"We've been using these types of technologies for close to 100 years. It's everywhere and they have to comply with the same standards."

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