Lifestyles

Hundreds of local food products available in Campbell River

(From left) Julie Jagt (Booster Juice), Colleen Evans (Chamber of Commerce) and Connie Kretz (Coastal Roots) hope the Campbell River Food Map will promote locally-grown foods. - Photo submitted
(From left) Julie Jagt (Booster Juice), Colleen Evans (Chamber of Commerce) and Connie Kretz (Coastal Roots) hope the Campbell River Food Map will promote locally-grown foods.
— image credit: Photo submitted

One of the more interesting harbingers of spring will be the sprouting of the Campbell River Food Map.

The Campbell River Food Map will début with more than 35 businesses and farms listing more than 700 locally-grown and produced products. These products range from local peppers, berries and other fruit, vegetable and meat products to jams, jellies and dairy.

“There are emerging opportunities for encouraging more local food consumption, as well as culinary tourism in our community,” says Colleen Evans, Campbell River Chamber of Commerce President and CEO. “The experience of culturally significant and unique foods that an area has to offer is becoming a vital part of the tourism experience, and the Food Map will help showcase the flavour of Campbell River and promote local businesses.”

The City’s web-based Food Map was developed in partnership with the Chamber of Commerce. The Food Map connects community members to local food producers and retailers. It also profiles businesses that carry Campbell River, regional and Vancouver Island-sourced agricultural products.

“Using the Food Map to buy local food map will help consumers reduce transportation costs and other environmental impacts associated with their food, while supporting local businesses in the community,” says Coun. Larry Samson, who holds city council’s environmental portfolio.

The Food Map also contains an inventory of public and private land available for growing food. City staff are assessing the potential of several municipal properties for small-scale food growing such as community gardens, and urban orchards, and some of these are listed on the Food Map as potential candidates for future community projects.

Private land owners are also able to list property available for small-scale food production or intensive backyard gardening. This land database will help community groups, individuals and new and young farmers find spaces to grow food and share resources.

“Local agriculture and food are becoming increasingly important in both tourism and our communities,” says Coun. Ron Kerr, who holds the council portfolio for culture and heritage. “Promoting healthier food choices, recognising the growing culinary industry, and highlighting the unique aspects of our local agriculture can help to build and promote our local culture.

“In Campbell River we have several food-themed local events such as the farmers markets, a wine festival, and the Salmon Festival. With the growing interest in local food, there is likely to be even more in the future.”

For more information, contact the Food Map coordinator at richard.buchan@campbellriver.ca.

For more information, watch for updates on the Sustainable Campbell River Facebook page, or visit the Green City section of www.campbellriver.ca.

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