Entertainment

Director explores secret suppers

Richmond’s Jordan Lee directed and filmed the documentary Secret Suppers of Vancouver, about the underground foodie world, which aired on CBC television last Saturday. The project began last summer, and he started filming chefs sharing their handiwork often in their own homes in the fall, with post-production work starting in April.   -
Richmond’s Jordan Lee directed and filmed the documentary Secret Suppers of Vancouver, about the underground foodie world, which aired on CBC television last Saturday. The project began last summer, and he started filming chefs sharing their handiwork often in their own homes in the fall, with post-production work starting in April.
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What began as a five-minute creative short about his friend’s culinary skills last year turned into a year-long documentary project for Richmond’s Jordan Lee, the fruits of which aired last Saturday night on CBC television.

Secret Suppers of Vancouver (tinyurl.com/JordanLeeSSV) revealed the Lower Mainland’s underground restaurant scene, offering a peek into the lives of four chefs who struggle to find their own niche, some of whom turn to using their own homes and kitchens to host modest gatherings of diners eager to challenge their palettes.

Facing the prohibitive cost of opening their own restaurant, these chefs have instead turned to hosting small parties while flexing their culinary muscles. Much more at home, here they’re free of the restraints of producing huge quantities of food for hundreds of customers, and the oversight of restaurant owners and managers.

Lee caught the film-making bug as a youngster playing with his dad’s old video camera, making movies with his friends.

A product of home schooling, Lee participated in a 16-week Richmond-based video production program called Kaleidoscope during his Grade 12 year.

He followed that up by earning a two-year diploma in technology at the British Columbia Institute of Technology, which taught him on the use of a camera, lighting, shooting, editing, planning and both pre- and post-production work.

“I’ve always had an interest in taking raw information and shaping it into something that people can easily take in, enjoy and learn from,” he said.

A founding-member of Rview—The Richmond Review’s youth journalism program—during its inaugural year in 2006, Lee said he’s long been fascinated with print, photography and video media as a means of communication.

Before recently being hired by Georgia Street Media, he worked for Blink Media Works, another Lower Mainland video production agency.

Lee was originally reluctant to turn his video-making hobby into a career.

But it has worked out better than he imagined.

He’s now got about a dozen videos on the go, including promotional and documentary productions for broadcast TV and for the web. He also completed and released a documentary last year, about how the coconut has helped transform the lives of residents of the Solomon Islands (tinyurl.com/JordanLeeCoconut).

Lee said he feels fortunate to make a living out of his hobby, and enjoys immersing himself in all things video production, working and researching videography techniques.

For more of Lee’s work, visit vimeo.com/user2548954 or visit his Facebook page at facebook.com/vansecretsuppers.

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