Entertainment

Joint poetry reading at Slocan Library

Barbara Curry Mulcahy and Tom Wayman  will be reading their poetry at the Slocan library on Sunday, January 19  - submitted photos
Barbara Curry Mulcahy and Tom Wayman will be reading their poetry at the Slocan library on Sunday, January 19
— image credit: submitted photos

It’s a happy start to the new year at the Slocan Community Library.

The new audio-visual room (“the foyer”) is complete, the electronic check-out system is up and running and they’re celebrating with a special event — on Sunday, January 19 starting at 1 p.m., you are invited to attend a joint reading by Tom Wayman and Barbara Curry Mulcahy.

Tom Wayman, who has lived on the Winlaw back road since 1989, will read from his latest two books of poems: Winter’s Skin and Dirty Snow.

Winter’s Skin (2013), his 19th book, is a collection of winter poems, many set on the Slocan Valley rail trail, and illustrated with photos of the valley by local photographers Rod Currie and Jeremy Addington.

Dirty Snow (2012) was recently declared winner of the 2013 Acorn-Plantos Award for People’s Poetry. This book deals with the effect of the Afghan war on daily life in southeastern BC.

Barbara Curry Mulcahy, who now lives in Slocan, will read poems from The Man with the Dancing Monkey, which was short-listed for two national awards in 1998. She will also read from one of her current writing projects, The Pancreas Replies, a collection of new poems about the human body inspired by a period of family illness. Canadian TV writer Andrew Wreggitt, (North of 60), has described Barbara’s poems as, “crafted with love and ruthless intensity.” She is currently working on a biography and a novel.

Wayman and Mulcahy have published poetry, fiction, essays, reviews, short stories, radio plays, columns and articles. Both of these accomplished writers are personable, approachable and entertaining.

Plan to treat yourself to a comfortable Sunday afternoon gathering at the library in Slocan’s wellness centre/fitness centre/library in the little red schoolhouse across from the Harold Street Cafe.

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