Community Papers

Gift from ‘warrior princess’ lives on

Colleen Flanagan/the news Heather Birosh honoured wishes of her daughter Hunter by giving a timely donation that saved a horse from slaughter. The pinto, that now bears Hunter’s name, is being cared for at J & M Acres Horse Rescue where volunteer Amy Lizee helps out. - Colleen Flanagan/The News
Colleen Flanagan/the news Heather Birosh honoured wishes of her daughter Hunter by giving a timely donation that saved a horse from slaughter. The pinto, that now bears Hunter’s name, is being cared for at J & M Acres Horse Rescue where volunteer Amy Lizee helps out.
— image credit: Colleen Flanagan/The News

The name of a teen who recently died of cancer, now lives on in the name of a Pinto saddlebred mare that she helped rescue.

Hunter Birosh died July 21 from adrenal cortical carcinoma – a rare type of cancer that attacks the adrenal glands.

She was Heather Birosh’s only child.

“Keeping Hunter’s legacy alive is now my life’s mission,” she said.

“I’m going to spend my life keeping her memory alive.”

Hunter’s legacy includes volunteering for the North Fraser Therapeutic Riding Association. Her mom said her daughter was often at their stables doing chores such as cleaning the stables or walking the horses. From the age of three, Hunter was passionate about the outdoors and animals, particularly dogs and horses.

In memory of her 19-year-old “warrior princess” daughter and in keeping with her last wishes, Heather gave $500, saved by her daughter while she was able to work, to J&M Acres Horse Rescue. That donation helped save the mare, that was on its way to being slaughtered for meat.

The donation covered the cost to save the animal as well as shelter and food costs until she is adopted. The horse is now named Hunter.

Heather wants to stay active and credits her daughter’s memory with the will to carry on. She’s working on other donations that she can give in her daughter’s name to groups that promote the outdoors or animals.

J&M Acres volunteer Amy Lizee and co-workers were touched by the donation.

“It’s an honour to be someone’s last wish.”

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