Community Papers

Langley Girl Guides show off handy skills

A group of Langley Girl Guides, ranging in age from six to 11, built a duck box as part of the Operation Earth Initiative. The group, which consists of Rhys Montana, Tyra Synder, Taylor Morgan, Emily Thoeny, Naomi Hoedemaker-Purvis, Payton Montana, Sara Thoeny, Klara Gavric, Ashley Morgan and Ella Smith. The duck house was installed on the Salmon River Trail on May 30. - submitted photo
A group of Langley Girl Guides, ranging in age from six to 11, built a duck box as part of the Operation Earth Initiative. The group, which consists of Rhys Montana, Tyra Synder, Taylor Morgan, Emily Thoeny, Naomi Hoedemaker-Purvis, Payton Montana, Sara Thoeny, Klara Gavric, Ashley Morgan and Ella Smith. The duck house was installed on the Salmon River Trail on May 30.
— image credit: submitted photo

Girl Guides from across the country — including a group from Langley — were among the 23 groups who made sure ducks had a safe place to lay their eggs.

Girl Guides were responsible for constructing 60 duck nest boxes which were hung in trees or on posts near marshes, streams and any other places where ducks were nesting.

The Langley Girl Guides built and installed their duck house on the Salmon River Trail on May 30.

The duck nest boxes provide ducks with protection from predators and harsh weather.

They are also built with wood certified to the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) which means the wood comes from forests that are sustainably managed.

The project was a collaboration between the SFI and the Girl Guides of Canada as part of the Operation Earth Action initiative, which focuses on doing service for the environment in fun and inspiring ways.

The project is also supported by Ducks Unlimited Canada and teaches the girls how they can have a direct impact in helping to improve the lives of ducks in their natural habitat while contributing to healthy and vibrant ecosystems across Canada.

“A key component of our mission is to enable girls to make a difference in the world," said Deborah Del Duca, CEO of Girl Guides of Canada.

"Building the duck nest boxes is giving them a tangible, hands-on way to learn about the positive impact they can have on our environment. In turn, we believe the experience will increase girls’ awareness of the world we live in."

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