Community Papers

Thrifty Foods honours May as Cystic Fibrosis Awareness Month

Doug Reiderer, manager, and Chelsea Young, cashier, at Campbell River’s Thrifty Foods urge everybody to come down to the store and make a donation to Campbell River’s chapter of Cystic Fibrosis Canada. - Photo submitted
Doug Reiderer, manager, and Chelsea Young, cashier, at Campbell River’s Thrifty Foods urge everybody to come down to the store and make a donation to Campbell River’s chapter of Cystic Fibrosis Canada.
— image credit: Photo submitted

Thrifty Foods in Campbell River, Comox and Courtenay are collecting donations at their tills during the month of May.

Managers Doug Reiderer, Campbell River, Andy Carter, Courtenay and Jeff Ackinclose, Comox locations have joined together in supporting the fight against cystic fibrosis.

Through their years of participation and support of the Rod Brind’Amour Cystic Fibrosis Golf Classic they have learned a great deal about cystic fibrosis and the impact it has on the people who have it, their families and friends.

“I recently met little two-and-a-half year old Maysa Milligan who is the poster child for our Thrifty Foods/Cystic Fibrosis fund raiser – she is an adorable youngster and it breaks my heart to know how sick she has been,” Reiderer said. “I was really impressed when Maysa thanked me for helping her – she struggled with the words cystic fibrosis but gave it her best effort. Really it is me who should be thanking her.  She made me realize it is so easy to take health for granted.”

Cystic Fibrosis is the most common fatal genetic disease affecting Canadian children and young adults.  It is a multi-system disease that affects mainly the lungs and the digestive system.

In the lungs, where the effects are most devastating, a build-up of thick mucus causes severe respiratory problems.  Mucus  and protein also build up in the digestive tract, making it difficult to digest and absorb nutrients from food. As improved therapies have helped to address the malnutrition issues, ultimately, most deaths related to cystic fibrosis are due to lung disease.

Currently, there is no cure.

Maysa takes many medications, uses a nebulizer several times a day and under goes physiotherapy at least twice a day to help loosen the secretions in her lungs.  She struggles with gaining weight and is on a special diet.  Her parents take her to Victoria every few months for check ups with the specialized cystic fibrosis clinic at Victoria General Hospital.

Sarah Milligan, Maysa’s mother said, “when Maysa was first diagnosed a few weeks after her birth, my heart ached for my daughter, so tiny and facing a life of struggle.  I alternated between raw emotion and deep gratitude – for the doctors and nurses caring for her and for the friends, family and strangers who are giving so much to help find a cure – I am so grateful to Thrifty Foods for everything they are doing to help.”

All funds raised from the donations you make at Thrifty Foods till go to Cystic Fibrosis Canada’s Campbell River/Comox Valley chapter.  They are used to fund vital research into finding a cure or control for CF and to high quality clinical care.

Jo-Ann Wallis, president of the chapter joins in the praise for Thrifty Foods and reminds people  “please be sure to mention you wish to make a donation as you go through the check out.  Every dollar you add to your bill will make a difference to the lives of children with CF.”

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