Community Papers

Buddhist Tzu Chi Foundation opens new doors

Buddhist Tzu Chi Foundation volunteers and city officials, including Mayor Malcolm Brodie, gathered on Wednesday to declare the opening of the global relief organization’s new home. - Jacqueline Langden
Buddhist Tzu Chi Foundation volunteers and city officials, including Mayor Malcolm Brodie, gathered on Wednesday to declare the opening of the global relief organization’s new home.
— image credit: Jacqueline Langden

One of Richmond’s largest volunteer foundations just got bigger.

Buddhist Tzu Chi Foundation volunteers and city officials gathered on Wednesday to declare the opening of the global relief organization’s new and improved establishment.

“We get so much from Canada, that’s why we have to contribute our volunteer services and many other things back to society,” said Jane Wong, Vice Director of Tzu Chi, Richmond district.

Tzu Chi translates into compassionate relief; the translation is an accurate depiction of how the foundation focuses its energy toward improving the greater good within communities worldwide.

The non-governmental organization has relocated within the same building, at 8788 McKim Way and increased its size to from 800 to 3,000-square-feet. The original Richmond office opened in 2006, but volunteers felt that the space was getting too small for their fleet.

Politicians including Richmond MP Alice Wong, Mayor Malcolm Brodie and city councilors Derek Dang, Chak Au and Bill McNulty helped cut the red silk ribbon, declaring the opening of the new Tzu Chi’s new location.

In 2013 the service had thousands of volunteers in Greater Vancouver, and their efforts have improved the lives of countless people.

“Anytime there is a any kind of disaster, you can count on the Tzu Chi organization to be of great assistance,” Brodie said.

All money raised by the foundation goes back into the community and helps support the city.

Locally, volunteers supply edibles to the food bank, help seniors in assisted living, offer educational courses in their facility and have donated over $170,000 to Richmond General Hospital. Globally, volunteers aid the remains and survivors after natural disasters.

The program’s missions include: charity, medicine, education, culture, environmental protection, international relief, community volunteer service and bone marrow donation.

Originating 48 years ago in Taiwan, the foundation has since expanded to 47 countries with 372 offices worldwide. Tzu Chi established it’s first Canadian branch in 1992, there are now branches in Toronto, Calgary, Mississauga and Montreal.

 

 

 

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