Community Papers

English names for Christina Lake places

Ad for the Cove Hotel from the Cascade Record of December 10, 1898. When they said “Give us a call,” they probably didn’t mean on the phone. - Cascade Record
Ad for the Cove Hotel from the Cascade Record of December 10, 1898. When they said “Give us a call,” they probably didn’t mean on the phone.
— image credit: Cascade Record

Fiftieth in an alphabetical series on West Kootenay/Boundary place names

Christina Lake has two English place names along its eastern shore – English Cove and English Point, both apparently named for a group of young men who settled there in the 1890s.

According to Lincoln Sandner in Christina Lake: An Illustrated History, “They were, in turn, under the guidance of Angus Stewart ... a very able Scotsman, well-known in this district as a newspaperman, teacher, scholar, and prospector, who was also the origin of the name Stewart Creek at Chase’s Point.”

English Point was first mentioned in a longer form in the Rossland Miner of August 13, 1898: “A store and hotel is being built at English Point Bay Landing. Why not abbreviate the long drawn-out name and call it ‘Mugg’s Landing.’ … With its hurriedly constructed hotel, saloon and store nestling under the shade of the tall trees and lapped by the waters of the lake, the scene will be typical of those brought out in the well-known drama Mugg’s Landing and why wouldn’t it be a good name for the new Christina Lake town?”

The English Point post office operated from April 1899 to August 1900, and the English Cove post office, to the southeast of English Point, from March 1909 to August 1911. J.W. Spaulding built several tourist cottages at English Cove as well as a resort hotel, and was appointed postmaster.

English Point was originally known as McRae Landing, named for Colin Scott McRae (1860-1952), a trapper and prospector in the area. It was referred to in ads in the Cascade Record beginning in late 1898.

Lincoln Sandner credits McRae with discovering the pass the Canadian Pacific Railway used in building its line from Castlegar to Christina Lake. McRae died in Greenwood at 92 and was buried there. His name survives in McRae Creek, so called by September 1896, and McRae Road.

Previous installments in this series

Introduction

Ainsworth

Alamo

Anaconda

Annable, Apex, and Arrow Park

Annable, revisited

Appledale

Applegrove, Appleby, and Appledale revisited

Argenta and Arrowhead

Aylwin

Bakers, Birds, and Bosun Landing

Balfour

Bannock City, Basin City, and Bear Lake City

Beasley

Beaton

Bealby Point

Bealby Point (aka Florence Park) revisited

Belford and Blewett

Beaverdell and Billings

Birchbank and Birchdale

Blueberry and Bonnington

Boswell, Bosworth, Boulder Mill, and Broadwater

Brandon

Brilliant

Brooklyn, Brouse, and Burnt Flat

Burton

Camborne, Cariboo City, and Carrolls Landing

Carmi, Cedar Point, Circle City, and Clark’s Camp

Carson, Carstens, and Cascade City

Casino and Champion Creek

Castlegar, Part 1

Castlegar, Part 2

Castlegar, Part 3

Christina Lake

Christina City and Christian Valley

Clubb Landing and Coltern

Cody and Champion Creek revisited

Champion Creek revisited, again

Columbia

Columbia City, Columbia Gardens, and Columbia Park

Comaplix

Cooper Creek and Corra Linn

Crawford Bay and Comaplix revisited

Crescent Valley and Craigtown

Davenport

Dawson, Deadwood, and Deanshaven

Deer Park

East Arrow Park and Edgewood

Eholt

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