Community Papers

Kinsmen make special donation

Front row, from left, Al Buxton of the Kinsmen Society was pleased to present Kara, mammography supervisor, Erin, mammography technician, and Stacey Marsh, executive director of the Hospital Foundation, with a cheque for new mammography equipment at Campbell River Hospital. Also pictured from the Kinsmen, back row from left are: Mark Sullivan, Rob Harris, Gus Murray, Phil Gardner, Rocco Bellosta, Andy Leitch, Bob Nicoll and Don Larsen. - Kristen Douglas/The Mirror
Front row, from left, Al Buxton of the Kinsmen Society was pleased to present Kara, mammography supervisor, Erin, mammography technician, and Stacey Marsh, executive director of the Hospital Foundation, with a cheque for new mammography equipment at Campbell River Hospital. Also pictured from the Kinsmen, back row from left are: Mark Sullivan, Rob Harris, Gus Murray, Phil Gardner, Rocco Bellosta, Andy Leitch, Bob Nicoll and Don Larsen.
— image credit: Kristen Douglas/The Mirror

Thanks to a generous donation from the Campbell River Kinsmen, cancer can be detected closer to home.

The Kinsmen’s $21,900 donation is going towards the purchase of a five megapixel mammography machine for Campbell River Hospital.

Currently, the hospital is using three megapixel machines, which means dictating the mammograms has to be done out of town.

Correct, accurate display of the mammogram is critical to achieving the right diagnosis.

There are a limited number of these such monitors on Vancouver Island, which makes the acquisition of these monitors for Campbell River extremely meaningful.

Each year there are approximately 4,000 mammograms performed in our hospital, with the technologists performing the task of acquiring mammography images and then sending the images to either Nanaimo or Comox hospitals for interpretation.

These monitors, along with recently recruited Radiologist Dr. Chilton, mean diagnostic interpretations can now be done here in Campbell River.  These monitors will also reduce the chances of calling a false positive, thus avoiding further imaging studies, and or proceeding with invasive procedures.

This will translate into reduced costs and reducing anxiety for patients.

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