Community Papers

Prince Rupert Search and Rescue recruiting volunteers

 RCM-SAR 64 crew help retrieve jumper/divers from the water and safely transport them to their designated vessels. The large international search and rescue training exercise north west of Prince Rupert on April 30th also included the Canadian Coast Guard, Canadian Navy, US Coast Guard, and US and Canadian Rescue Centres.  - Contributed photo
RCM-SAR 64 crew help retrieve jumper/divers from the water and safely transport them to their designated vessels. The large international search and rescue training exercise north west of Prince Rupert on April 30th also included the Canadian Coast Guard, Canadian Navy, US Coast Guard, and US and Canadian Rescue Centres.
— image credit: Contributed photo

Question: What do graphic artists, IT administrators, lawyers, engineers, divers, managers, paramedics, sales people and bankers have in common?

Answer: They are all dedicated to saving lives on the water through their involvement with the local Royal Canadian Marine Search and Rescue station, RCM-SAR 64.

They are also looking for others in the community to join them and will be holding a recruitment and information session on Thursday, June 13 from 5:30 pm to 6:30 pm at the Prince Rupert Curling Club.

"Diversity is one of our strengths," says Shawn Petriw, President of the Prince Rupert Marine Rescue Society, the non-profit organization associated with RCM-SAR 64.

"We have members from many different walks of life and that variety of skills and backgrounds that are a real asset to accomplish all the things that need to get done to run a high-performance volunteer station and serve our community."

That diverse background, combined with a comprehensive, ongoing training system keeps members of RCM-SAR 64 skilled, prepared and flexible. From answering Mayday calls at a moment's notice to being aboard the safety vessel for community events such as Dragon Boat Days and SeaFest, crew members are active year-round, with numerous crews on the water each week training in boat handling, navigation, first aid, leadership, and search and rescue techniques.

"We are also hoping to implement a number of SAR prevention and safety programs for the community this year," said Petriw, "and those activities would be ideal for people who want to be involved without the rigorous training crew members are expected to keep up with."

Some of these programs include Kids Don't Float, a child-sized PFD lending program, a free Pleasure Craft Safety Check, and a new Vessel Safety Survey program.

"And like all non-profits, we need to make sure the business side of our organization is ship-shape," said Petriw.

"We're always looking for those skilled in administration and board development to join our ranks and contribute at the board level."

Those looking for a challenging and rewarding opportunity to serve their community are encouraged to attend the recruitment and information session and confirm their attendance by e-mail at info@marinerescue.ca or by calling Shawn Petriw at 250-600-0945. More information is also available by downloading the recruitment flyer at http://marinerescue.ca/recruit2013.pdf

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