Community Papers

Architect talks Kin Centre progress

Ian McKay of PBK Architects of Vancouver designed the Kin Centre Enhancement Project, and visited Prince George this week to meet with other parties and answer questions from the public.  - Alistair McINNIS/Free Press
Ian McKay of PBK Architects of Vancouver designed the Kin Centre Enhancement Project, and visited Prince George this week to meet with other parties and answer questions from the public.
— image credit: Alistair McINNIS/Free Press

Looking from the parking lot, there appears to be a lot of work ahead to complete the Kin Centre.

But Andy Beesley, the manager of CN Centre and recreational facilities for the City, says construction is close to 50 per complete. The Kin Centre Enhancement Project is the most significant facility upgrade for the 2015 Canada Winter Games. The $16-million project began last May with a target completion of October.

Beesley said that the project is still on time and budget.

Ian McKay of Vancouver-based PBK Architects designed the new facility. Yellowridge Construction of Langley is building the new centre.

An open house for the project was held Wednesday inside the Kin Centre atrium. McKay made a day trip to the city.

McKay’s relationship to Prince George projects dates back to his efforts planning the CN Centre, which opened in 1995. His experience in arena design dates back to 1993.

McKay, a registered architect for the past 10 years, has been involved with building design for 25 years.

Asked what feature of the Kin Centre project he likes the most, he talked about the roof of Kin 1.

“We’ve got steel structure, but all-wood roof, so wood was important to the city obviously. They have their wood-first policy, so being able to put all that wood in, I think, will be the showpiece,” he said. “I think connecting the three rinks together was the main goal too because they were three separate rinks which weren’t connected so well. This new work will connect them up and make it really usable and nice for public too because you’ll walk in, you’ll be able to wander through between them.”

The final project will include a renovated lounge area with a new concession, new dressing rooms, expanded portable seating and new glass to make it more spectator friendly.  Kin 1 will be expanded to an Olympic standard (200’ X 100’) from the previous non-conforming size (185’ X 85’) to meet Canada Games requirements.

The framework for the new roof is already being put in place.

“The next phase that we’re seeing is the outer shell starting to go up, and the first stage of that is to put up the giant metal beam structure,” Beesley said.

Although construction began only 10 months ago, McKay noted that they completed a Kin Centre study about a decade ago. At that time, they knew renovation work would be necessary. The Canada Winter Games’ funding allowed the project to move forward.

McKay was awarded the project in the summer of 2011. The drawings were completed a year ago.

 

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